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Newbee lokking for a kite to start with

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guyver
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Postby guyver » Sun Jul 28, 2002 2:17 am

HAd my trainnig, and wanted to know with witch kite to start ( 2 lines or 4 lines ? )

and how big 6-7-8-9 ? , I live in holland and the wind is nice here.

I like freestyle and jumping the most.

Somebody have some tips 4 me, maybe also for a board (combo)

tnx alot
..safe boarding..

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kitingkt
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Postby kitingkt » Sun Jul 28, 2002 2:36 am

hi,

what do you mean by 'nice' wind? 15 knots, 20-25 knots?

i have a Seasmik Alpha 7.2 for sale. it is brand new, i am selling it for a friend who bought it and now just hasn't the time for the sport. it is too small for me here, only 10 knots on average.

let me know if you are interested. i would sell it for $300 USD.

kevin

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Postby Guest » Sun Jul 28, 2002 7:57 pm

Hi guyver!

Look for an inflatable 4-line kite (which may be convertible to a 2-liner or the other way round). If you have anyone to help you getting the lines right, don't bother going through the 2-line fase. Best size would be around 12 m2 flat area. You can later buy a bigger one for lighter wind if needed, but this is a good size to start with. Look at the aspect ratio of the kite: if it is "thinner" it will turn faster and be harder to control for a beginner. (Examples: Naish X2, North Rhino, Wipika Airblast) Go for something a little bit slower (examples: Naish Aero, North Toro,...)

Good luck with it, and be carefull. Start in very light winds (the kite will drop sometimes but that's normal), and go out with only a little bit harder wind each time. And read all the safety stuff on this and other pages.

Veel geluk ermee!

guyver
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Postby guyver » Sun Jul 28, 2002 10:21 pm

Nice a dutch person :smile:
tnx 4 your advice, i've heard that the toro is a nice kite to start with, the 2001 model and later, and good to control, a have asked and u can built it to 2 line, still have to proctice a lot, the is nowind in holland now, very sunny, still woundering what the best harnas is ( to attach your kite on) and is there a section here where kite - starters can read some do's and don'ts ?
And do u need a wide board a thin board, when you start ?

tnx 4 the reactions,

greets Sander ( holland )

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murdoc
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Postby murdoc » Sun Jul 28, 2002 10:31 pm

you may fly the toro with 4 lines but without using the depower in the beginning.

i used to learn it like this - i was only hooked in when getting everything in order to start and then hooked off and strted - so i had less dragging cause i depowered ...


to buy a 4 line kite and convert it is wrong!
you may buy the naish r3 in 9 or 11m and convert it to 4 lines when you feel ready for it ... a good kite to learn kiteboarding :smile:

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Postby Royce » Sun Jul 28, 2002 11:41 pm

Learn on a 4 line kite. Get instruction preferably from someone with a boat. Stay safe learn fast.

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Postby Guest » Mon Jul 29, 2002 11:38 am

Hi Guyver,

as for the board, look for a rather large twintip. There's all the time discussions about whether a directional is better or a twintip, but everyone seems to agree that a twintip is easier. You won't loose so much time learning to gybe, so you will have lots more time in the straps and thus on the water. You can then later one get yourself a mutant or other directional, if you have tried one and think the better sailing characteristics justify the hassle to learn the gybe. I just swapped my beginner directional for a twintip and tried it first time this weekend. It was a blast!
Anything from 170 cm upwards should be good.
If you have no windsurfing or wakeboarding experience, see if you can arrange anyone with a boat on these no-wind days. If you practice behind a boat (a lot easier then when you have to steer your kite at the same time), your learning curve will be way steeper. The idea is that you first learn to control the kite and the board seperately and only then go for the combination, as soon as these things come more naturally.

Nogmaals, veel geluk ermee! (Sorry, not a Dutch person, but a Belgian (Flemish) :wink:)

guyver
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Postby guyver » Mon Jul 29, 2002 12:58 pm

Tnx belgian anounymous :smile:

i'll keep your advice at hand, now i'm learning how to fly a whipka ( at out school) Hope 2 be in the woather quicklt, i have some surf experience, hope the wind goed up these day's.

greets Sander


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