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PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 12:20 am 
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Tom183 wrote:
nobody really wears enough thermal protection to spend several hours in cold water, if we did we would overheat during normal riding.


Not true. When I go out in water that is less than 50 degrees, I wear a 3/2 wet suit and thick polypropolene long underwear under my dry suit. I do get warm, but I don't overheat.

After a session in 42 degree water, I went out with my PFD and floated for a half hour. I kept my head and hands completely out of the water and I honesty did not get cold.

I read that good swimmers can not swim more than a hunderd yards in this cold of water. The reasoning is the physical exersise of swimming causes increased blood cirulation to the bodies outer surface which rapidly cools the body to hypothermia (which causes cramping and poor judgment).

http://www.hypothermia.org/inwater.htm

http://www.americancanoe.org/safety/coldwater.lasso

After my half hour float, I desided to swim down the coast. I got about a hunderd yards and was completely exhausted. The thing that suprised me was how cold I got from my swim. During my swin, my head and hands had got very cold and acted as radiators for my blood. Part of my exhaustion was from swimming in a drysuit but I was suprised by how much was because I was now cold and shivering.

The reason I did this experiment was to 1) better understand my limits and equipment limits, 2) see if cold water safety proceedures were correct about swimming 100 yards.

If I would have stayed floating, I bet I would not have started shivering until around an hour, but my swim had me shivering in much less time.

Quote:
Dry or wet, when temps are low you have to stay close enough to shore to get out if things go bad.


True, but the most important thing a person can do is to kite with others. Another thing is to kite in a wind that has some onshore component. I bet if the person you mentioned followed this he would still be alive.

Kiting alone in cold water is dangerous. Doing it alone in an offshore wind is a fatality waiting to happen.

Quote:
I think the pyro surf looks pretty interesting, I just wonder how long it will last under the friction from a harness.


I have not used an OR, but I have used an OS and Oneil. I have not seen any wear caused by my seat harness.


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 Post subject: drysuit
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 4:18 pm 
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Location: tunisia
i generally have to piss once or twice during a sail , how do you deal with a drysuit, (ie don' t you get really cold taking your kit off?)


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 6:15 pm 
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Location: BC Coast
You will only ever piss in a drysuit once! Because you do not get as cold, yoy don't seem to have the same urgency to piss.

As to Tom's question about layers: I wear a pair of fleece track pants, T-shirt and medium fleece top under a Pyro. That keeps me warm in 8 Celcius water & air temps ranging from 3-9 celcius(Canadian west coast).

Personally, I can't wait to get out of my 5/4mm wetsuit and into the pyro surfsuit. The water is frigging freezing for surfing here.(and most of our surf is in the winter). For most people who surf in these conditions, I don't really think there is much of an argument for not waring a drysuit and being warm & having manouvrability at the same time.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 2:24 am 
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Location: The United Mistakes of America
Thanks for the info about layers, spring will be here in 6 weeks and I may have new suit by then. 8)

Don, I think you actually confirmed what I was saying - shivering after an hour is a bad sign, and most of us would try to swim first, which (as you showed) just means getting colder sooner. But you're right in saying there are other factors to consider: onshore wind, riding with others, etc.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 11:21 pm 
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Location: Milford-on-Sea
i wear an all in one fleece. i think used my divers in summer conditions in britain, it does me through the winter, can get a bit chilly after a couple of hours but is pretty good.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:14 am 
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Location: Vermont, USA
Like any piece of equipment, know what it can do. A dry suit can do things a wetsuit cannot. If you are in trouble, you can pull the neck seal up over your mouth, inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth. Your suit will inflate and provide a high level of float. You can then float on your back and frog kick with little effort, and stay warm. I have done this in ice flows. Fairly amusing, but a great survival trick. Know your gear.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2007 5:47 am 
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Location: Vancouver, Canada. rides Naish,Ozone,North, Spotz,Aguera
Interesting trick kjelleren, I will try to remember this if I ever get in trouble.

I have been using the OR drysuits in the cold winter months for several years now and they are great. They have made kitesurfing into a year round sport here in Vancouver, Canada. It was snowing here this morning but there were at least two dozen kiterboarders out, and probably the majority were wearing Ocean Rodeo drysuits.

Nobody around here has ever had a dangerous incident due to their drysuit.

I got my first look at the Pyro Surf suit recently. It is really just a light weight drysuit with a lycra covering that wraps it close to your body. This will obviously make you slide through the water better which is important for surfing, but I honestly don't think that a regular kiteboarder will prefer it over the regular Pyro products. But I have not actually tried it ...we will see.

:wink:
Chris Glazier


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 12:28 pm 
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Location: NYC
Tom183 wrote:
I am aware of at least 1 fatality involving a rider wearing a drysuit - blown out to sea in sideshore winds that shifted side-off, near sunset during the cold season (November? Connecticut?)


actually, there is no proof that his death was because of the drysuit. if he had been wearing a wetsuit and died, would he have died because of the wetsuit?

he ditched his kite before he got too offshore, unfortunately, this was not enough. note, he was not wearing a pfd.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 12:31 pm 
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Location: NYC
Tom183 wrote:
I am aware of at least 1 fatality involving a rider wearing a drysuit - blown out to sea in sideshore winds that shifted side-off, near sunset during the cold season (November? Connecticut?)


yes there was a fatality involving a guy wearing a drysuit, but there is no proof that his death was because of the drysuit. if he had been wearing a wetsuit and died, would he have died because of the wetsuit?

he ditched his kite before he got too offshore, unfortunately, this was not enough. note, he was not wearing a pfd.

besides, polypropylene and fleece keep warmth even wet, and there is no circulation inside the drysuit.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 12:36 pm 
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Location: NYC
Tom183 wrote:
I am aware of at least 1 fatality involving a rider wearing a drysuit - blown out to sea in sideshore winds that shifted side-off, near sunset during the cold season (November? Connecticut?)


yes there was a fatality involving a guy wearing a drysuit, but there is no proof that his death was because of the drysuit. if he had been wearing a wetsuit and died, would he have died because of the wetsuit?

you got most of it right though, he got blown out to sea in sideshore winds that shifted side-off, near sunset, during the cold season. it was nearly dark when his kite went down, most of the search was done at night, nearly impossible to find anyone then.

he ditched his kite before he got too offshore, unfortunately, this was not enough. note, he was not wearing a pfd.

regardless, polypropylene and fleece keep warmth even wet, and there is no circulation inside the drysuit.


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