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 Post subject: kitesurf industry jobs
PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 9:00 pm 
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Just wondering what kind of jobs there are in the kitesurfing industry and what they require. For example would a kite design job require a aeronautical engineering degree or similar?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 9:37 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2001 1:00 am
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Location: Flysurfer founder and constructor
Hi

Like for every job, knowledge and motivation is important. A aeronautical engineering degree or similar is very good.

You should also have magic hands to tune kites, have the feeling for aerodynamic and good CAD-Software knowledge.

You should agree, to earn less money that you can earn with the same effort in other business.

Bye, Armin


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 9:40 pm 
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Location: Muenchen + Cagliari
specificaly computer engineering program are required ... but some kite-industries just buy a kite of other company and do a copy :lol: .


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 1:26 am 
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Location: Central CA
me and my dad have been talking about this. My whole life ive desired to be an aeronautical engineer and I start college next fall. And pretty much my whole life ive wanted to kiteboard.
Im curious, who are designing the kites? It seems to me that the designs have come from trial and error. But if a true aeronautical engineer stepped and and studied/tested for a couple of years, couldnt they produce an ultimate kite?
Just my thoughts and that. I build robots for my school and if we were given just a year we would eventually reach a point where no design improvements could be made (or at least very minimal :) )


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 1:30 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 5:54 am
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Location: Central CA
oh one more thing. Anykite companies located in CA? Just asking for future possibilites.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 1:36 am 
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If you look at some back issues from The Kiteboarder, you can see Designer's backgrounds in Designer's Corner.

CA Kite Companies: Caution, Liquid Force


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 Post subject: __
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 1:45 am 
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Location: New Zealand
You can usually only benefit from having an educational background in your subject.

Solid engineering knowledge is a very useful grounding/start and will reduce the number of mistakes/prototypes made first time around when designing for the real world. However, it is no substitute for extensive practical experience/prototyping. This is because all the maths in the world may say your paper design is great; however, when you ride it - it may be total toss for some other reason.

I also think it is good to think outside of what you are taught in education and challenge theories(test them out) - by far the best way to learn for yourself.

I think you will learn more from your practically experienced failures than successes


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 2:02 am 
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I think if there were more engineers / scientists in the sport it would look very different, we would probably be a few years ahead in the designs. People without that background have to learn using trial and error what is obvious for someone with that education.

For example, take a look at adding dashes for kites.
We only see that on inflateables in 2008. Flysurfer, the super duper technology gurus with massive aeronautic background from designing paragliders and sail, had it in 2004. Same with many other things, like the shape of the first crossbow that was shockingly similar to the very efficient Psycho, and you can go on and on.

Now imaging if the tube companies introduced those features at the same time flysurfer did. My guess is that things would look different now after a few years of fine tuning.
Not that I have anything against the gear you can get today which is awesome, I just think we could have had it much earlier, or maybe its about time that
FLYSURFER BUILD A DAMN INFLATEABLE :) :) :)

Of course there is no substitute to hands on experience and good guts feeling that also comes from experience.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 8:17 am 
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thanks guys


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 8:38 am 
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how hard would it be to mke your own kite. If you just knew wht you were doing nd had goodsewing technique it should be ok. Could you base your design on an existing kite eg. a blade. Would ripstop nylon do?


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