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Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby klimber » Mon Mar 30, 2009 6:56 pm

remember that helping may be just staying out of the way.

unless you know what you are doing, don't try to help.

even a well intentioned hand can make things worse.

I sat bobbing in cold water for 15minutes while another well intentioned person was trying to figure out how to grab my board and bring it close. if he would have ridden by before helping and asked I would have said no and would have body dragged back upwind in 3 minutes.

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby Golden Cobia » Mon Mar 30, 2009 7:18 pm

I've witnessed situations where kiters tried to help each other to find their kites tangling in the air and lines being cut and making a huge mess of what was nothing more than a little body drag upwind to recover a board.
If you crash your kite and have to swim to shore I guess that's part of the deal. I don't know many kiters that could do a good job towing a wet kite/kiter without tangling themselves with lines etc.
I guess the courteous thing is to approach safely and ask if everything's ok and act within your limitations. maybe just help by bringing the board to the beach while the person swims in.

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby tautologies » Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:02 am

I think for the most part we help each other here. I've seen more of it lately where riders are left to themselves, and it is a little worrisome since we sometimes ride very far from shore.

Like PF is saying there is a lot more going on modern kites, once I had a kite fly up my lines, and after a kiters CL broke, and I tried to pick up his kite and ride it to shore...suddenly I was stuck with two kites...which made for an awkward ride back to shore..., I would much rather loose my session than have someone drown.

If I see someone I always check if I can help and I think most people especially the more experienced riders do the same. If I see someone down their kite, I linger to see how it develops, and I've had to help out nor only kiters (rider, board, kite), but windsurfers, kayakers, canoers and snorklers. A kiter-friend of mine even helped a sailboat after it capsized and it got dark...

We all need help sometimes, and I really truly think that it makes it safer/better for everyone if we keep an eye out for each other. So I say this, start a conversation on the beach, try to spark the idea that help is reciprocal...and that EVERYONE will at some point need help out there...

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby prwinds » Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:20 am

Hi Habi, where was that?

Im glad the fellow kiter found a helpful hand with you eh. I mean did you help him? what was wrong with him?

if once is able to help why not? but you have too see, if he lost his board he was probably asking for it, I have had this happen dozens of times, I really look everywhere for the board ride away just looking for the board, but really the sometimes look like they dissapear

I dont know people are usually helpfull where I ride. Fellow kiters that actually setup their dinghys just to look for a board or a kiter,
You too have given me hand here with my kite remember :D haha that was a crazy day when I used your dinghy with 13 foot swells just to look for the pink waroo.

It all depends on how it happened really

EDIT: we as kiters really have to count on each other, I for example dont like to ride alone, I try to ride when theres at least another guy out in the water, it just feels safer that so yes, obviously we expect for us to look after each other

good winds!
Last edited by prwinds on Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:28 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby Windrider » Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:26 am

The funniest assist I ever provided was to a visitor who was down with tangled lines pretty far out in the bay. I had just come in and was on the beach. I saw a kite go down pretty far out in the bay and kept an eye on it. After about 10 minutes, I hadn't seen much progress with the kiter's attempt to relaunch and the kite had rolled several times. I noticed a lady looking in the same direction with a worried expression. I asked if she knew the kite that was down. It was her husband. She said he was a good kiter and shouldn't be down that long. I offered to go out and check on him. I re-launched and kited out there. He was finished wrapping his lines on his bar and almost ready to do the self rescue to shore. Everything was cool and under control. He probably had another 20 minutes before he would land on the beach. I told him that his wife was worried about him. He laughed. His only request was that I go back to the beach and tell his wife that he was okay. I sailed back to shore and relayed the message. She felt much better. The End.

Sometimes it helps just to be the messenger boy.

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby prwinds » Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:34 am

Windrider wrote:The funniest assist I ever provided was to a visitor who was down with tangled lines pretty far out in the bay. I had just come in and was on the beach. I saw a kite go down pretty far out in the bay and kept an eye on it. After about 10 minutes, I hadn't seen much progress with the kiter's attempt to relaunch and the kite had rolled several times. I noticed a lady looking in the same direction with a worried expression. I asked if she knew the kite that was down. It was her husband. She said he was a good kiter and shouldn't be down that long. I offered to go out and check on him. I re-launched and kited out there. He was finished wrapping his lines on his bar and almost ready to do the self rescue to shore. Everything was cool and under control. He probably had another 20 minutes before he would land on the beach. I told him that his wife was worried about him. He laughed. His only request was that I go back to the beach and tell his wife that he was okay. I sailed back to shore and relayed the message. She felt much better. The End.

Sometimes it helps just to be the messenger boy.
hahaha yeah exactly, usually most of the time its a good choice just to leave the person pack up and work it out himself and maybe swim the usual 30 minute swim...great workout...but I think every kiter does check up on each other, its human nature really.(or maybe not!)

My experience over here in Puerto RIco has been great, at least for now, the local kite crew is pretty small and pretty much everyone knows each other even if its just by sight.

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby simonm » Tue Mar 31, 2009 2:35 am

Unfortunately, one of our local spot has been inundated with kiting clowns this year. The spot has a very strong outgoing tidal current which runs into sometimes quite significant surf. The spot has been the scene of numerous drownings in years past. The launch site is also very sketchy with lots of rocks and little room for error. This year has seen a spate of learners there who simply refuse to listen to the advice of more experienced riders. They are often unable to body drag, self launch, self land or self rescue in what is a very testing spot when things mess up. Many of these people seem to expect that they will be rescued by other kiters or the life savers. What they don't realise is that those people who rescue them can be putting their own lives at risk to do so. Many locals in the area are fed up with spending their weekend time pulling out idiots who have no sense of self preservation or respect for the safety of others. As such, a growing number of people are reluctant to grab boards for those who don't even have the basics such as body dragging under control. Obviously anyone in real trouble is assisted as quickly as possible, but it is sad to see that the all for one and one for all mentality of times past is diminishing as the patience of the local crew is tested time and time again by those who are endangering themselves, endangering others and consequently endangering our access to kite at this spot.

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby tautologies » Tue Mar 31, 2009 3:38 am

simonm wrote:Unfortunately, one of our local spot has been inundated with kiting clowns this year. The spot has a very strong outgoing tidal current which runs into sometimes quite significant surf. The spot has been the scene of numerous drownings in years past. The launch site is also very sketchy with lots of rocks and little room for error. This year has seen a spate of learners there who simply refuse to listen to the advice of more experienced riders. They are often unable to body drag, self launch, self land or self rescue in what is a very testing spot when things mess up. Many of these people seem to expect that they will be rescued by other kiters or the life savers. What they don't realise is that those people who rescue them can be putting their own lives at risk to do so. Many locals in the area are fed up with spending their weekend time pulling out idiots who have no sense of self preservation or respect for the safety of others. As such, a growing number of people are reluctant to grab boards for those who don't even have the basics such as body dragging under control. Obviously anyone in real trouble is assisted as quickly as possible, but it is sad to see that the all for one and one for all mentality of times past is diminishing as the patience of the local crew is tested time and time again by those who are endangering themselves, endangering others and consequently endangering our access to kite at this spot.
This actually brings up a very important point. How do you recognize when someone is in mortal danger?

First of all, it can be dangerous to move close to someone that has panic, as they are not always rational. Look at their faces, if the eyes are wide wide open, it might be a signal that the person is panicking.

Try to gauge the person by sitting a little away and talk to the person. Some years ago we had an outrigger capsize in double overhead waves with about 8+ or so kids ages I think 12-16 (I don't really know). The canoe pummeled over the reef, but the kids were stuck between an outgoing tide and big waves. The wind was very weak making the rescue really hard. I could see the kids eyes were as wide as possible. The kid I pulled out grabbed around my neck almost strangling me, and he would just not let go. I am glad he was not bigger as we both would have ended in trouble that way. I had problems staying upwind and only got one of the kids out. Some other kiters that could go upwind stayed and helped the rest while I kited back to the beach to alert the lifeguards..by the time I got back out the rest of the kids were in safety (other kiters pulling them out).

Another time I helped a snorkeler and he grabbed onto my bar, he did not panic though so it was resolved pretty fast

....the point is that while you should help if you can, you should definitely not make the situation worse by getting into trouble yourself so be careful.

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby windmaker » Tue Mar 31, 2009 5:53 am

Unfortunately, one of our local spot has been inundated with kiting clowns this year. The spot has a very strong outgoing tidal current which runs into sometimes quite significant surf. The spot has been the scene of numerous drownings in years past. The launch site is also very sketchy with lots of rocks and little room for error. This year has seen a spate of learners there who simply refuse to listen to the advice of more experienced riders. They are often unable to body drag, self launch, self land or self rescue in what is a very testing spot when things mess up. Many of these people seem to expect that they will be rescued by other kiters or the life savers. What they don't realise is that those people who rescue them can be putting their own lives at risk to do so. Many locals in the area are fed up with spending their weekend time pulling out idiots who have no sense of self preservation or respect for the safety of others. As such, a growing number of people are reluctant to grab boards for those who don't even have the basics such as body dragging under control. Obviously anyone in real trouble is assisted as quickly as possible, but it is sad to see that the all for one and one for all mentality of times past is diminishing as the patience of the local crew is tested time and time again by those who are endangering themselves, endangering others and consequently endangering our access to kite at this spot.
Unfortunately, one of our local spot has been inundated with kiting clowns this year. The spot has a very strong outgoing tidal current which runs into sometimes quite significant surf. The spot has been the scene of numerous drownings in years past. The launch site is also very sketchy with lots of rocks and little room for error. This year has seen a spate of learners there who simply refuse to listen to the advice of more experienced riders. They are often unable to body drag, self launch, self land or self rescue in what is a very testing spot when things mess up. Many of these people seem to expect that they will be rescued by other kiters or the life savers. What they don't realise is that those people who rescue them can be putting their own lives at risk to do so. Many locals in the area are fed up with spending their weekend time pulling out idiots who have no sense of self preservation or respect for the safety of others. As such, a growing number of people are reluctant to grab boards for those who don't even have the basics such as body dragging under control. Obviously anyone in real trouble is assisted as quickly as possible, but it is sad to see that the all for one and one for all mentality of times past is diminishing as the patience of the local crew is tested time and time again by those who are endangering themselves, endangering others and consequently endangering our access to kite at this spot.
Obviously helping a person in real danger is a must ! Apart from that you also get the same persons getting in trouble 5 times per day, usually self taught and un-awear of dangers involved in resquing them. I always say, don't go further than what you are prepared to swim !

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Re: Why not help other fellows when they are in trouble?

Postby tungsten222 » Tue Mar 31, 2009 8:29 am

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