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 Post subject: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:08 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 24, 2013 7:02 pm
Posts: 6
Hey everyone,

I'll be taking lessons in January on Sanibel Island. I'm putting together a quiver of gear that me, my dad, and my girlfriend can all progress on after our lessons. I'm trying to strike a balance between gear that would be usable for my dad and gf on this two week trip, with gear that I will want for myself in the future.

As I think we will primarily be kiting in low winds, I'm trying to get some low wind gear. At this point I'm looking for a directional board that planes early, would be a piece of cake to learn on, and would be fun in small chop and for going fast and carving once i get better. No bigs waves yet, nothing too high performance.

There are two on the used market that I'm looking at, a 2011 f-one fish (5' 2"), and a 2011 north free race.

With regards to these specifically, and free race/light wind surfboards generally, what can be expected in terms of low-end potential, and ease of learning?

The fish is small, but my gf is 55kg and I am 65kg. I'm guessing my dad would be too large for it at 85kg?

I have experience with other board sports and tend to pick things quickly and enjoy challenges. My gf on the other hand will probably find all of this very difficult, and I honestly doubt she will be up and planing and comfortable with the kite unless we had a whole summer to practice. My dad is somewhere in between.

The gear that I have so far:
cabrinha crossbow 11m
naish torch 9m (i know :nono: , couldn't help it. this one will be for me!)
142 cm SS misfit board (with very little rocker)
a harness that fits me and my gf, and one that fits my dad

so, other than another LW board, the obvious next step would be to pick up a 14m+ LW kite. I'm wondering if i can avoid this however, if we have the misfit, and a directional?

Lots of questions and information, I know, but I thank you for any advice you could give! Mods please move this thread to the new rider forum if you think that is where this should be, but that forum looked a bit dead.


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:44 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2005 1:17 am
Posts: 2171
Location: Save a life...adopt a Pitbull
Used Slingshot Dialer for Dad.
Slingshot Space Pickle 5.0 for everybody.
North Nugget 5.0 for everybody.
The F-One Fish for you and girlfriend.


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:45 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 28, 2010 6:58 pm
Posts: 656
jeesus

1 good thing - u are getting into lessons

couple of comments
- take lessons in the spot you are planning to use. it´s a great way to know the local crew and this is gold
- stop buying material
- ask your instructor all those questions


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:52 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2008 10:13 am
Posts: 170
In my opinion even after 2 weeks unless you are exceptional you will not be ready for a directional yet. Although it looks and is cool you need more then beginner skills to ride directionals. I think your money would be better spent on a used or closeout (sales on now) big light wind Twintip board. Once you learn the bascis including riding toe side then try a directional. Also look into a Dynabar if you want to ride directionals in the future.


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:58 pm 
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The North Freerace 2011 5'3" x 47.5cm is not a lightwind directional EZ to learn on

Our favorite LW directional board (me and better half) is the 2013 North Nugget 5'0" x 21 in.

That board is very difficult to find on the used board market

Works for all body weights !!

Example....she is 52kg....i am 75 kg......and i have a friend who raves also about it and he is 109 kg

Good luck

Just my 2 cents


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:12 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 16, 2002 1:00 am
Posts: 5628
Location: Denmark
I disagree...

Find that directionals are better to learn (teach) on, than twintips :thumb:

It all started with directionals, as they were easy and intuitive, the first 3 years of kitesurfing.

Then came the TT craze back in 2002-3, and lasted many years, so it was almost the "norm" back then.

Today it has changed, and besides waveriding and light wind race and freeracing and high wind touring and hydrofoils, they are also good for beginners IMO.

At least those who know they are aiming for a directional later, OR, those having directional experience from other sports :naughty:


Three very distinct advantages with a directional:

1. You dont need the same amount of kitepower to start up, and flotation when the pull dissapears for moments (as all beginners experience).
2. The board will track forward by itself, no specific technique required.
3. You dont have to stand in the awkward back leg bent stance, and the board wont skip sideways like a TT the first many times.

8) Peter

PS: Sorry I did not answer your question, but others did...
The Freerace is of course the best performing light wind board, but not as easy as the Fish to ride.


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 12:02 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 2:47 am
Posts: 472
I haven't tried the boards OP mentioned. But I can tell you that an Airush Sector One is way easier to learn on than the other board I have, a 2011 Cabrinha raceboard which is a very nice board but not nearly as forgiving as the Sector One. Also consider the huge fins on a lightwind directional, not sure you want to learn on a board that could impale you if you land on it when it's turned over.


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 12:13 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 3:37 am
Posts: 2371
Quote:
Although it looks and is cool you need more then beginner skills to ride directionals. I think your money would be better spent on a used or closeout (sales on now) big light wind Twintip

Somewhat disagree.
If you have wakeboard experience, a twintip may be easier.
If you have a little snowboard experience, it does not necessarily transfer well.
If you have surfing experience, or windsurfing, a directional will feel "natural" from day one, and
you can actually go upwind on your first day, on a directional. You won't make jibes on any board for a while, so don't worry about that.
I would say stop buying stuff, too..

The key is to speed your learning by concentrating on one thing at a time.
So, if there is any kind of board you're good at riding start with that kind!
Otherwise you may flail around trying to learn too many things at once for many sessions, all the while hearing instructors try to encourage you and talk about the "learning curve," they may say is "huge" or "vertical." Another, honest way to describe that is to say it's like a brick wall. It takes a lot to climb over it. Breaking it into steps is a more useful concept.

If you have no boardsports experience and are committed to trying a twintip, take the trouble to learn to ride your kiteboard behind a boat or ski for a few hours, so you can switch directions and have some idea of edge control, before trying to learn all that, plus how to fly the kite at once.
It can also help if you have some sailing background, but it isn't really all that necessary.

Take a lesson, enjoy it.
Try 2-3 types of kite to see what you like.
The cabrinha is a fairly good bet for starting though, good range and depower.
The shops are thin on the ground in SW Fl.
The outfit in Ft Myers is odd. My impression is it's basically a windsurf/SUP store, that usually employs a young guy to teach kiters. I think they sell cabrinha.
If you do buy a directional, I would second the Slingshot dialer, it is big and very stable, and goes upwind well, good in light wind. Also the nugget, but try some things before making the commitment. And like Munney said, don't go for the long, sharp fins first.


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 12:43 am 
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Posts: 6
interesting to hear the comment about the ft. myers shop; I had been planning on taking lessons there. The other option is an independent guy thats been teaching for decades it seems (windgypsies).

perhaps i'm getting ahead of myself by buying gear, but the stuff at the shop (even the used gear) is easily twice as expensive as what I've been getting. Even adding a 3.5m trainer, I've spent less than a grand on gear, and I could easily sell some of it after our trip. I'd like to get atleast a second board so that my dad and I can kite together. Will re-consider a lightwind TT. The fish is very good deal but if my dad can't ride it due to its size, kinda defeats the purpose, since hes the heaviest among us.

looks like new dialers can be had for around $500 shipped. The used fish would be around $330 shipped.


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 Post subject: Re: lightwind directionals that are easy to learn on
PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 1:26 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2013 10:08 pm
Posts: 5
You sound like you're in a very similar situation that I was in when I first started learning not too long ago. I live up near Clearwater and know what the wind is like here in Florida. I started with a 12m Envy and a 136x42.5 twintip. I was almost never powered and was seriously struggling with learning how to ride. So I went out on a limb and decided I was going to get a light wind board. I also decided to go the directional route. I got the Airush Sector 60 v2 and it was the absolute best decision I have ever made for kiteboarding. I learned to go upwind on this board and my learning progressed so much faster. Of course there are some downsides, like needing at least 2 feet of water due to the fins. But I could get out and ride upwind from 12 knots with my 12m. Now I have a 14m and line extensions and I can ride this board and really get going in like 10 knots. My vote is for the Airush Sector. Awesome lightwind board and it sounds exactly like what you need.


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