Contact   Imprint   Advertising   Guidelines

Complete beginner advice..

forum for kitesurfers


FattyArbuckle
Rare Poster
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:16 pm
Kiting since: 0
Local Beach: Fraisthorpe
Favorite Beaches: Mui Ne
Style: Clueless
Gear: None
Brand Affiliation: None

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby FattyArbuckle » Fri Feb 23, 2018 8:19 am

I loved Mui Ne and Vietnam in general...its not for everybody, could drive some mad...The people are friendliest I,ve ever met and wind probably most reliable / steady. ( every pm to at least 20 kts in Mui Ne and by all accounts 5 kts more up at Phan Rang, where there is a massive ( but tidal) lagoon ( flat water) leading to a Coral reef break...( Google Phi Kite centre Vietnam) We went there twice and wind was over 30 kts..( guess) Kiters were on 5 metre kites !! Kiters can use lagoon most states of tide,,, windsurfers need tides over 1.2 m ( goes to 1.4) WS would get perhaps 3 hrs/ day..Kiters double that..
If all goes ok with kiting I,ll be going back to Mui Ne next Jan or Feb.. If it doesn't I,ll go to Phan Rang WS on lagoon and have more kite lessons during stay..

FattyArbuckle
Rare Poster
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:16 pm
Kiting since: 0
Local Beach: Fraisthorpe
Favorite Beaches: Mui Ne
Style: Clueless
Gear: None
Brand Affiliation: None

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby FattyArbuckle » Fri Feb 23, 2018 8:23 am

Ps.
On low state of tide you can walk through lagoon and sail/ kite nice waves..( Boots recommended tho, it is the south China sea ...

pākihiroa
Medium Poster
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:24 am
Kiting since: 2009
Gear: Cabrinha
Brand Affiliation: None

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby pākihiroa » Fri Feb 23, 2018 10:22 am

IMHO, when transitioning from windsurfing to kitesurfing, a key habit you need to unlearn is this:

Windsurfing - When things start getting out of control, always hold onto the boom. Why ? To stop getting whacked by the rig.

Kitesurfing - When things start getting out of control, let go of the bar. Why ? Because, until you have many hours on the kite and can fly it by feel without looking at it, the kite will likely fly much better without your input thank you very much. Let go of the bar and you will likely have a depowered kite that will float serenely down to the water or, if you are in luck, climb serenely to 12 O'Clock. On the other hand, hold onto the bar and you will likely simultaneously fully sheet it in and steer it, with the result, if you are lucky, it will crash fully powered up into the water or, if you are unlucky, it will do first do a big, fully powered, loop followed by an equally fully powered crash into the water.

I wish someone had given me this advice before I first started kitesurfing. :whistler:

Also, I agree with FLandOBX. Practice plenty on the trainer until you can fly it by feel without looking at it. Then, when learning to water start, you can concentrate on looking where you are going and let muscle memory take care of flying the kite. Because you can't look at the kite and where you are going at the same time. The caveat to this is that a 2m trainer will fly a lot differently (faster) than a 10m or 12 m.

RalfsB
Medium Poster
Posts: 148
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 2:45 pm
Kiting since: 2010
Local Beach: Beaches close to Riga, Latvia
Style: Freeride
Gear: Kites: Ozone, Naish; Boards: Airush Sector, Alpine foil, some self-made boards.
Brand Affiliation: None
Location: Riga, Latvia

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby RalfsB » Fri Feb 23, 2018 10:28 am

I do not think it is worth it to buy a dedicated trainer kite because you will need it probably for an hour or so. It would be better to borrow, if it is an option. If you have somebody to instruct you, you can start with like 9m inflatable in 4-5 m/s wind and it should be pretty safe and you can use this kite later in strong winds.

FattyArbuckle
Rare Poster
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:16 pm
Kiting since: 0
Local Beach: Fraisthorpe
Favorite Beaches: Mui Ne
Style: Clueless
Gear: None
Brand Affiliation: None

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby FattyArbuckle » Fri Feb 23, 2018 11:53 am

Thanks again everybody...Talking to an instructor and he said one of problems windsurfers bring into sport is clutching hard onto bar...

iriejohn
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1021
Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2015 11:04 pm
Kiting since: 0
Local Beach: West Sussex
Gear: this 'n that
Brand Affiliation: None
Location: South coast, UK

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby iriejohn » Fri Feb 23, 2018 1:02 pm

As already said, get lessons ASAP. Before then try to borrow a trainer kite because after a few hours you'll understand flying a kite and become bored with it. Don't fly a "proper" kite (LEI) on dry land, a few tomahawks will almost certainly trash it. At 105kg at Fraisthorpe you'll need a 14m and a 44-46 wide twintip for lighter winds. Good luck.
FattyArbuckle wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 11:53 am
Thanks again everybody...Talking to an instructor and he said one of problems windsurfers bring into sport is clutching hard onto bar...
He's right. When the wind kicks in when windsurfing you pull on the boom, when kitesurfing you push on the bar. As a 25 year windsurfer I found it very difficult to get rid of this reflex, it's a bitch.

badgb21
Frequent Poster
Posts: 457
Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2003 8:55 am
Kiting since: 2004
Favorite Beaches: High Pines - Duxbury
Chapin/Mayflower Cape Cod
Langebaan
Cape Verde
Gear: CrazyFly, Ozone, Cabrinha, Concept X Ruler Split.
Brand Affiliation: None
Location: Hants UK

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby badgb21 » Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:53 pm

Hi Alphie
I saw your thread on the ‘other side’.
I’m 56 and a bit heavier and enjoy both sports.

Some good advice above, just wanted add my 2 cents, all helps the confusion!

If you have an idea of the type of kiting you want to start with and the wind range, that helps, you sound fairly clear on this from what I’ve read. Planing ahead will save you time and most of all, money!

If you assume freeride kiting from 15mph to 30mph, then it may be reasonable to consider 2 boards and 3 kites. The lighter wind gear will also be your learner gear.
Something like 145 -155+cm light wind board and a 135 to 140 higher wind board.
Kites: maybe 9, 12, 15. Four-line LEI kites. One or two bars will cover you for the kites.

A comfortable harness is the very best option.

Get lessons with an instructor you can communicate with – you know what I mean dude!

Once you have had lessons you’ll be in the real learning ‘vacuum zone’.
You’ll probably want to buy some kit at this point. It’s much easier if you seek the help of a good kiter here to guide you. I’m sure your instructor will have some input too.
Once you have some gear, a kite buddy at this point will be really helpful. Someone to launch/land you and help you progress, as well as keeping an eye out will build confidence. Even someone at the same level will help, you’ll figure most things out between you.

My opinion of a trainer kite is mixed. Probably better off with a power kite and a mountain board over the playing fields, but it hurts when you fall and not essential to do. If you are struggling a bit with the kite during lessons or you could get one before you start them, it may help get an idea of the wind window, but coming from windsurfing a good Kite instructional DVD may be all you need.
Flying an LEI standing in thigh deep water will give you a far more real feel of the kite. Body dragging gets you a real feel for it, as your lessons will reveal.
Mastering getting the board on your feet and keeping the kite in the air, may keep you busy for a while! All part of the fun!

When you can kite out, maybe fall in, then kite back, whilst holding your ground, will be a land mark point. After this the rest, like slide turns, will come quickly.

Just a few of the things I found got me to the first land mark;

At 105Kg a large board will really help. I got a ‘Door’ board 165cm and it was the key for me.
I still keep one for summer days. Transformed my learning.

You need plenty of power as a beginner and being a big lad. I used a too small kite, as advised by smaller folk for too long and struggled. Power will get you up and going and allow you hold your ground. It’ll feel like way too much power, just like windsurfing did! A kite buddy helps here with the confidence thing.

It’s all about the kite and controlling it. The board skills will be easy, almost intuitive, but that kite will hit the water so fast when you first put the board on, you won’t believe it’s possible!

As said, you will be pulling on that bar! I used to sit watching TV with a harness on and a bar attached, practicing pushing away and finding the quick release and leash release with my eyes shut, helps break the w/s memory.

Hope it all goes well and you get to enjoy both sports.
Last edited by badgb21 on Fri Feb 23, 2018 5:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

FattyArbuckle
Rare Poster
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:16 pm
Kiting since: 0
Local Beach: Fraisthorpe
Favorite Beaches: Mui Ne
Style: Clueless
Gear: None
Brand Affiliation: None

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby FattyArbuckle » Fri Feb 23, 2018 5:38 pm

Thanks.. Great post..🏄

Archer77
Medium Poster
Posts: 73
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2016 1:42 pm
Kiting since: 2016
Local Beach: Porto Pollo, Sardegna
Style: freeride
Gear: Ozone Zephyr v5 17m
Ozone Catalyst v1 12m, 9m
Shinn Bronq 135/41
Brand Affiliation: None

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby Archer77 » Fri Feb 23, 2018 5:59 pm

Hi FattyArbuckle,

I'm just somenthing more than a beginner, here the thing that helped me more and my suggestion:

- don't buy a trainer kite neither a small LEI(Leading Edge Inflatable) or Foil one, starting almost you will never use a small kite in high wind...
- borrow, rent or just ask to a teacher in your school for a trainer kite to use 2/3 hours to understand how the things simply work
- give an extensive watch to this youtube channel, (don't say too loud and don't do that but practically you can get expert at Kiting just with them ...( watch in the playlist particularly if you want them grouped))
-https://www.youtube.com/user/alexiobussio/featured
-https://www.youtube.com/user/nkbrocks/featured
-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgT85W ... 8ei3-gAEqA
- take some lessons too because having an instructor following you it's just enough too feel better in approaching this awesome sport
- consider that shallow flat water with stable wind between 15 and 20 knots is the easiest condition to learn, you can extend to 25 knots after the first lessons, in this condition your learning curve will be much better, and in shallow water you will get back your board far faster(not consuming all the time of the lesson trying to get the board back), in any case is important too learn how to get back the board in deep water...

now you have my personal cheat sheet :D
(almost 1 year of research on the web...)

have great fun!

p.s. here just my opinon and advice on the kite type and size to use on that wind range, by my experience:
13/18 knots Ozone ZephyrV5 17m (easy and super low wind kite)
16/22 knots Ozone CatalystV1 12m (perfect for beginners and good also for something more)
20/25 knots Ozone CatalystV1 9m IDEM
board for your weight probably at least >145cm long >44cm wide (but probably better a little much bigger like 148cm long and 46cm wide especially if in the lower part of the wind range of the kite)

Matteo V
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 556
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 3:42 pm
Kiting since: 2008
Local Beach: US, Iowa/Nebraska/Kansas/Utah/Oregon Coast
Favorite Beaches: Ft. Stevens, North coast of Oregon
Style: Just like school in summertime
Gear: Delta Kites and LF Kitefish QuadMod
Snowboard (Cambered and Rockered)
Foil kites on the snow
Brand Affiliation: NONE F--- the corporate world

Re: Complete beginner advice..

Postby Matteo V » Fri Feb 23, 2018 7:48 pm

FattyArbuckle wrote:
Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:26 pm
By the way...My thoughts were to buy smallest LEI I,d ever likely to need in future as my " training / power kite" ( Perhaps a 7 metre ?)
A trainer kite's main value is not in it's training ability. It's value is in you NOT WRECKING your nice 7m kite. As others have said, trainers can be useful for lots of other things.

1. You can give a friend the experience of flying a power kite without the danger - MAKE SURE you buy a smaller trainer kite as 3-4m trainers (the big ones) can have too much power for smaller adults in medium winds
2. You can figure out the basics on handle passes with a trainer kite and evaluate your shoulders ability to handle those handle passes
3. You can practice parking the kite and sending a text message with your free hand (one hand flying essential to putting a board on)
4. You can practice kite loops and gain more of an understanding/instinctual feel for the wind window, instead of being afraid of the power that a full sized kite(7m is full sized)
5. You can practice water starts on land more safely and with less power (simulating light wind starts) than you ever could on a 7m kite.

And, this has been debated many times - LetsFlyaKite will go against me on this one, but buying a used kite at the end of it's lifetime for your first kite will likely immediately get you some experience in kite repairs. Go new on your first kite in that 12m range. Buy 2 kites at first (for a 75kg kiter) a 10m and a 12m depending on if those sizes fit the average/sane/happy local conditions. More weight and lighter winds means you could go with a 12m and 17m for your first kite. Higher winds and lighter weight means you would go for a 10m and an 8m.

Wait to go for that smaller kite until you get skills with the mid range kite sizes. Then once you have that smaller kite, go for a ridiculously huge kite (likely a Slingshot Turbine in 19m for your mass) as your 4th kite. Then go for a teeny-tiny storm kite as your 5th kite when you master the LW and the smallest kite.

Once you purchase your "teeny-tiny" kite, you will be ready to give up your high wind windsurfing gear. That may be years from now, but it will happen. Hold onto your high wind windsurfing gear till the very end.

Oh, and kitesurfing has the overall advantage over windsurfing. One of the things that kitesurfing does lack is the challenge. Windsurfing is a longterm challenge with a long path to becoming an advanced windsurfer. In kiting, you will be (or feel) advanced in one year of hitting it hard.

If you give up on windsurfing, you will likely miss the difficulty of the simplest of things in windsurfing. But with a kite, you eventually come to appreciate the simplicity of the most difficult of things in kiteboarding.


Return to “Kitesurfing”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google [Bot], or6 and 10 guests

cron