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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2002 4:01 pm 
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I just got the details a few minutes ago on an accident that happened in England recently. It involved a young rider being dragged 100 m across the beach and a high speed roadway in ONSHORE WINDS. He apparently could not unhook. He was remarkably unhurt as he didn't hit any of the speeding cars or other hard objects. A KSI account will follow but lets be aware of the risks and precautions out there. It is an extreme sport and there will be accidents, let's just work to cut down on the avoidable ones.

Rick Iossi


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2002 4:07 pm 
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Well they can ban ya for ridin on the wrong side of the road in a curve but can they get ya for riding across the traffic at high speed behind a traction kite goin Oooooooooohhhhhhhhhhh shiiiittttttttttt?

Lucky man, someone should go gambing with him, make a ton o dosh.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2002 5:17 pm 
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Lucky man, someone should go gambing with him, make a ton o dosh.


Joseph, you are a funny man. :grin:


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2002 5:22 pm 
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Yeah, couldn't help myself.

Have still got th giggles, am a sick man


Hope Rick is right about him being ok or I'll feel like a jerk.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2002 11:22 pm 
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The key then is AVOIDANCE. Do not place yourself into such situations as you may not have time to avoid a bad experience.


This is what I meant!!!!

The wind doesn't care about you but you should!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2002 11:53 pm 
Well, we all agree then, kiters are the danger,we do stupid stuff, we talk long and hard about being safe then go stupid and choose poor launch situations. If we make it we talk about style or huck, or which rig rules, if someone gets hurt or worse we talk about saftey for awhile then go kite if we make it we talk about style or huck and life goes on and on, You gota lov kiting Its not realy even close to being safe for newfolks yet we all lov it and want to share. Once again there seems to be always somthing when it comes to this awesome experience! So beware, behave, and by all means go big! and if in doubt make sure no ones taken notes. I don't want to sound like it can't improve but lets face it this sport can easily be your last one, but we don't care and so we are the problem! shrug* lets kite!


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2002 12:14 am 
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On 2002-11-05 15:34, RickI wrote:
Having a good snap shackle or QR may not be good enough to save you from a nasty impact if things go wrong. In many launch or nearshore accidents, things happen at such incredible speed as to eliminate the possibility of effective reaction. The KSI is full of such experiences. Having the type of accident that allows time for rapid analysis and appropriate reaction seems to be a bit less common.


Rick - I think you are spot on with avoidance being the first line of defense.

However, as you have just stated, even with gear equipped with the latest safety features, things are often happening faster then we can react. In skydiving, it is commonplace to see a person with 000's of jumps and years of experience practicing emergency procedures - rehearsing so to speak. This is something that most long time jumpers get into the habit of doing. Mock ups are built to simulate an emergency situation (strung up to the ceiling with your gear on and get your buddies to shake the shit out of you while you try to pull your emergency handles, being the most simple). Some simple free fall math will tell you that from an average main parachute activation altitude, a jumper has around 10-12 seconds before they hit the ground. Take away 3-5 for your reserve to open and another 2 or so to get clear of what ever mess you are in (optimistic). That leaves around 5 seconds, give or take, to save your life with emergency procedures. This is why we continue to practice even when after leaving student status.

From what you have said, kiters may not have the luxury of 5 seconds to sort things out. Even more reason to practice pulling your handles.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2002 12:15 am 
Rick, for the cheap seats... what is KSI? Please give a link if possible.

Thanxs


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2002 12:18 am 
Rick, for the cheap seats... what is KSI? Please give alink if possible

thanxs


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2002 1:32 am 
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The KSI is located at:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/kitesurf/ ... EFERENCES/

and is in the process of being updated with about seven new accidents.

Zoomie, too true. I was speaking with Jeff Howard about this subject yesterday. In many emergency situations you by the time you have overcome initial shock, figured out what happened and processed what to do, you have already gone too far down the road to help yourself. It is just too fast. Safety gear like helmets, impact vests and gloves may make all the difference particularly when things are taken out of your control.

Talking with John Holzman a few months back he was emphatic about "training" students as opposed to instructing them. To be honest the distinction escaped me for a while but it came into focus eventually. Instructing may limit to a mental level whereas training may address things on a more visceral level. That is if you are thoroughly trained in a physical emergency procedure you may rapidly react as opposed to overcoming shock, analyzing, sort out options and try to act, perhaps too late.

I have advocated rehearsing mentally reaction sequences for a couple of years. I think it would be even better to act out the response in basic steps, over and over again. More about this later but your point is well made.

Rick Iossi

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RickI on 2002-11-06 03:39 ]</font>


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