*


All times are UTC + 1 hour



Post new topic Reply to topic
 [ 15 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: New kiteboarder in NC and SC area
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 7:11 pm 
Offline
Very Frequent Poster

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 3:37 am
Posts: 2416
You can save half the money by shopping around for lessons instead of going to real for that.
Use that money to buy a kite (used, $500-800).
Consider buying a used 12m or bigger envy or rpm from Real, though!
That way you establish a relationship without throwing down too much money right away.
They are mostly nice folks, but their pricing is high.
Plus, no need to trash a $1600 new kite in your first season or two!
I did, and it just held me back from progressing.
The one thing I did right was get a big kite though, since I learned in light wind on the east coast, like you.
Do try out different seat and waist harnesses before you buy.
Don't get a board less than 135 long for your first board.
Get a cheaper beginner or light wind board preferably 137-145 by 42-44.
This is also a good idea because you live in a light wind area....

If you aren't a surfer and don't know how to wakeboard, learn the basics of that first, while you play with a trainer kite on land. Be comfortable with carving back and forth and edging to go in and out of the wake before you drop money on kite lessons. A few sessions will go a long way to making the transition to kiting easier. If you already know how to wakeboard, get a kiteboard and wakeboard on it -take it easy, get used to the feel of straps and flat rocker.

If you are a surfer, seriously consider learning to kite with a surfboard first.

I would say, do all that stuff through spring, then go to real for a 2nd lesson if you want in June or July when the SW winds come in steadily, and progress with them, get their advice on quiver building if needed, buy if the price is right (10-20% under "retail"). Your money may be better spent this way.

Or go on and hit Real like a high roller in Vegas, come away with a few bruises and down $2,000-5,000 after your first weekend. If you pick it up right away, you might not care, but if the weather is bad or you have trouble getting started, you may feel a bitter taste in your mouth on the long drive home.

Either way, it takes commitment, but most people end up feeling it's worth it!


Top
Profile
 Post subject: Re: New kiteboarder in NC and SC area
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 7:34 pm 
Offline
Medium Poster

Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 7:42 pm
Posts: 109
BWD wrote:
You can save half the money by shopping around for lessons instead of going to real for that.
Use that money to buy a kite (used, $500-800).
Consider buying a used 12m or bigger envy or rpm from Real, though!
That way you establish a relationship without throwing down too much money right away.
They are mostly nice folks, but their pricing is high.
Plus, no need to trash a $1600 new kite in your first season or two!
I did, and it just held me back from progressing.
The one thing I did right was get a big kite though, since I learned in light wind on the east coast, like you.
Do try out different seat and waist harnesses before you buy.
Don't get a board less than 135 long for your first board.
Get a cheaper beginner or light wind board preferably 137-145 by 42-44.
This is also a good idea because you live in a light wind area....

If you aren't a surfer and don't know how to wakeboard, learn the basics of that first, while you play with a trainer kite on land. Be comfortable with carving back and forth and edging to go in and out of the wake before you drop money on kite lessons. A few sessions will go a long way to making the transition to kiting easier. If you already know how to wakeboard, get a kiteboard and wakeboard on it -take it easy, get used to the feel of straps and flat rocker.

If you are a surfer, seriously consider learning to kite with a surfboard first.

I would say, do all that stuff through spring, then go to real for a 2nd lesson if you want in June or July when the SW winds come in steadily, and progress with them, get their advice on quiver building if needed, buy if the price is right (10-20% under "retail"). Your money may be better spent this way.

Or go on and hit Real like a high roller in Vegas, come away with a few bruises and down $2,000-5,000 after your first weekend. If you pick it up right away, you might not care, but if the weather is bad or you have trouble getting started, you may feel a bitter taste in your mouth on the long drive home.

Either way, it takes commitment, but most people end up feeling it's worth it!

Are you from here? You sound like it anyway. I come from a snowboard wakeboard back ground but I've been wake boarding enough to know how to get up and carve back and forth but wouldn't say I'm great at it. I do pick up on things very quickly though. I like your idea of buying a used envy or rpm from them to start on. I may do that and once I ride a bit and really know what I want and need I can go buy new then. Plus I'll be able to price shop if i know exactly what I want. The only thing I didn't understand from your post was on my second lesson at real get their advice on quiver building, what is that? I haven't heard that before. Also from what I've read they are the only authorized instructor at the outer banks. I don't mind going somewhere else for lessons but I don't know where to start in looking for some where else to get the lessons. Can you or someone point me in the right direction on that.

I really appreciate all the info you guys are giving me. Im hoping to make this learning curve very easy and fast. I'm not rich so I can't waste a ton of money on mistakes so all your advice is really really appreciated.


Top
Profile
 Post subject: Re: New kiteboarder in NC and SC area
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 8:04 pm 
Online
Very Frequent Poster
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2010 6:27 am
Posts: 2553
Location: Ford Lake, Michigan
I think you progress a bit faster if you go with a brand new kite. I have a bunch of old kites now, and I have to baby them, otherwise they will split in half, I have some other lines that will snap if I kiteloop them too hard, I have one bar that is totally solid and two others I don't trust a lot. If you do rip a brand new kite in half, then just get it sewn back together not a big deal. But if you are on an older kite and a noob, you won't even know the limits of the kite. Just my opinion, but it's nicer to be able to go balls out from the very beginning because you trust your brand new gear, than to wonder if this time the kite will rip in half because the fabric is shot. There are some used kites that are like brand new but how is a beginner supposed to know what to look for? I started with a brand new kite and I put it through hell. If I had started with one of the used kites I have now, it would have ripped in half the first time I tomahawked it.

I suppose at the end of the day it matters how fast you want to progress. If you are ok, taking it slow, then accept if you get a used kite you might have to resell it, that you might be off the water for a week while you get it repair because older kites fail more quickly. If all you want is progress as fast as possible nothing beats brand new gear, it lets you push it a lot harder.


Top
Profile
 Post subject: Re: New kiteboarder in NC and SC area
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 8:34 pm 
Offline
Very Frequent Poster

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 3:37 am
Posts: 2416
Quote:
authorized instructor
:lol: :lol: :lol: actually there is no such thing, don't worry about it, or about any such nonsense as PASA IKO etc.
These alphabet soups are not very nutritious!
They can't make you skilled or safe.
You don't need a packaged resort experience to learn, and there are shops in the SOBX and SC that can help you just as well as in OBX. OBX does offer great flat water and more reliable wind than elsewhere in the southeast though...
There are also lots of options in OBX. Do some research, ask around.... You don't have to just choose between the red barn and the pastel palace.
Do make sure you get someone with a focus on safety.
I can't really be more specific because I am not personally experienced with the instructors. I learned elsewhere, though I live in VA and ride also in SC and NC.

BTW "quiver" is just jargon for your collection of gear, like a golfer's collection of clubs...
For example you might take lessons, get a 12m kite, and ride around in 15 knot winds a while, then realize you also want a 9m kite so you can ride comfortably when it is gusty and up to 25 knots. Then you would be able to say, "dude I have a 2 kite quiver that is good from 13 to 25 knots. Or maybe 30, uhh 27?.."
Likewise you might get a surfboard after a while or whatever....
I just meant that if you go for a lesson at real, once you have some skills, they can help you hone them. They also have a lot of different gear you might demo, and by watching you ride, they might be able to help you get gear that suits you or complements what you already have. -surely they would be happy to sell you something anyway!
Which gear to get as you progress, a friend might also help you choose wisely. Hopefully you will make kiter friends and ride with them, trade gear around a bit to see what suits you...

Another thing, I hate to be a pimp but I have to say, the slingshot gear is more heavy duty than most other brands. Also, don't mistake any of what I say about Real as a diss, they run a great operation in a lot of ways.

BTW still disagree with edt, look at the gear.
Obviously if it is highly worn, don't buy.
You can get year-old top of the line setups for 40-50% of retail, with little wear.
What to look for is simple:
crisp, shiny fabric with out fading or frayed edges at seams.
Intact stitching without stretched out holes around the threads.
Lines and bridles that are smooth and not all fuzzy or totally dull.
Pulleys and cleats that operate smoothly.
No major corrosion (slight staining at welds is ok for SS parts).
Repairs should be few and small, or the price should be low.
etc.
Basically, common sense and inspection or good detailed pictures will show the condition of a kite pretty well -better than the condition of a boat or a house or a car!!!


Top
Profile
 Post subject: Re: New kiteboarder in NC and SC area
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 9:01 pm 
Online
Very Frequent Poster
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2010 6:27 am
Posts: 2553
Location: Ford Lake, Michigan
BWD wrote:
don't worry about it, or about any such nonsense as PASA IKO etc. These alphabet soups are not very nutritious! They can't make you skilled or safe. You don't need a packaged resort experience to learn


Agree with BWD, don't worry about the acronyms.


Top
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic
 [ 15 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC + 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group