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Importance of foil weight/float

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BWD
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Re: Importance of foil weight/float

Postby BWD » Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:51 pm

Heavy things hurt more when they hit you.
If you fall poorly (ahead of the board) you hope the board/foil has little inertia and little stability so it may not hit you, or if it does, may hurt less.

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Peter_Frank
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Re: Importance of foil weight/float

Postby Peter_Frank » Thu Dec 07, 2017 9:33 pm

Lighter, just as stiff, hydrofoils are way better IMO and liking.

But I am spoiled, having used these a lot - but have also ridden many alu foils, so have quite a lot of experience with these types.

In reality it is a luxury thing with lighter gear :roll:

For jumping and doing freestyle in the air, lightweight means EVERYTHING :thumb:

For handling and allround carving lightweight is awesome :thumb:

BUT, for waterstarting, it means nothing, honestly...

The first few times you use a heavy but good alufoil, you will have sincere problems timing your strapless waterstart :wink:

But, after a few times you get used to the timing difference, and there are no advantages of the lighter ones in terms of waterstarting, seriously.

For beginners the lighter ones might be a tad easier, strapless, but it does not make any difference when you are experienced.

Having said that, I would never ride a heavy foil myself now - but as said, I am spoiled being used to really good gear :naughty:

8) PF

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bragnouff
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Re: Importance of foil weight/float

Postby bragnouff » Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:33 pm

A buoyant foil will come in handy when you hit a rock at full speed and rip the plate away from the board. If it floats, you'll get your foil back quickly, although it is likely to be in a very bad condition...
If it sinks, it could be more of a mission to get it back.

So rule #1 with foiling: Do not hit rocks at full speed!

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tegirinenashi
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Re: Importance of foil weight/float

Postby tegirinenashi » Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:34 pm

I would suggest that the problem is not alum mast itself, but more of sloppy fuselage design. For example, LF alum fuselage weights 1200 grams. When located 1 meter away from the board, its angular momentum is the most contributing factor to the speed with which the foil sinks. It has really dull shape where the thickness at the ends is the same as in the center. I have easily cut off the excess metal to drop it below 800 g.

LF is not alone in mediocre design by any means. Slingshot HG is arguably the champion of fugly, but hey, many people are still happy riding it.

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Re: Importance of foil weight/float

Postby tomtom » Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:02 am

Peter_Frank wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 9:33 pm
Lighter, just as stiff, hydrofoils are way better IMO and liking.

But I am spoiled, having used these a lot - but have also ridden many alu foils, so have quite a lot of experience with these types.

In reality it is a luxury thing with lighter gear :roll:

For jumping and doing freestyle in the air, lightweight means EVERYTHING :thumb:

For handling and allround carving lightweight is awesome :thumb:

BUT, for waterstarting, it means nothing, honestly...

The first few times you use a heavy but good alufoil, you will have sincere problems timing your strapless waterstart :wink:

But, after a few times you get used to the timing difference, and there are no advantages of the lighter ones in terms of waterstarting, seriously.

For beginners the lighter ones might be a tad easier, strapless, but it does not make any difference when you are experienced.

Having said that, I would never ride a heavy foil myself now - but as said, I am spoiled being used to really good gear :naughty:

8) PF
many thanks for opinion.

so just for have sense of scale. what is light and what is heavy.? it must look like dumb question but I just start and no producer except horue display any weight specs.

in other words if i want buy light freeride “greg” style foil which it is :D ?

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DukeSilver
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Re: Importance of foil weight/float

Postby DukeSilver » Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:06 am

tomtom wrote:
Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:02 am
Peter_Frank wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 9:33 pm
Lighter, just as stiff, hydrofoils are way better IMO and liking.

But I am spoiled, having used these a lot - but have also ridden many alu foils, so have quite a lot of experience with these types.

In reality it is a luxury thing with lighter gear :roll:

For jumping and doing freestyle in the air, lightweight means EVERYTHING :thumb:

For handling and allround carving lightweight is awesome :thumb:

BUT, for waterstarting, it means nothing, honestly...

The first few times you use a heavy but good alufoil, you will have sincere problems timing your strapless waterstart :wink:

But, after a few times you get used to the timing difference, and there are no advantages of the lighter ones in terms of waterstarting, seriously.

For beginners the lighter ones might be a tad easier, strapless, but it does not make any difference when you are experienced.

Having said that, I would never ride a heavy foil myself now - but as said, I am spoiled being used to really good gear :naughty:

8) PF
many thanks for opinion.

so just for have sense of scale. what is light and what is heavy.? it must look like dumb question but I just start and no producer except horue display any weight specs.

in other words if i want buy light freeride “greg” style foil which it is :D ?
Liquid Force mast / strut married to a Jim Stringfellow wing is what he has been using in the past. I think he has changed this setup recently though.

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DukeSilver
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Re: Importance of foil weight/float

Postby DukeSilver » Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:12 am

tegirinenashi wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:34 pm
I would suggest that the problem is not alum mast itself, but more of sloppy fuselage design. For example, LF alum fuselage weights 1200 grams. When located 1 meter away from the board, its angular momentum is the most contributing factor to the speed with which the foil sinks. It has really dull shape where the thickness at the ends is the same as in the center. I have easily cut off the excess metal to drop it below 800 g.

LF is not alone in mediocre design by any means. Slingshot HG is arguably the champion of fugly, but hey, many people are still happy riding it.
Haha, so true about the Slingshot fuse. It's an awful design to look at and the thing I dislike most about my Hoverglide. It is strong though. My friend bent his Zeeko fuse within a week of getting his new foil. I'm surprised SS haven't offered a lighter carbon fuse as an upgrade option.


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