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Beginner on advanced board: Bic Airflow 162

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Beginner on advanced board: Bic Airflow 162

Postby Guest » Wed Jul 23, 2003 8:25 pm

I'm around 210 ponds. I bought a Bic Airflow 162 from a Hatteras shop this spring. I don't know why the dealer didn't warn me that the board is for Advanced riders. I did tell him that this would be my first wake board (currently use 7'3" directional). Also, on Bic's site it says that it's a high wind board (20+ knots) and it rarely gets windy around here (Toronto area).

At this point I don't know what to do: should I "bite the bullet" and go through learning curve on advanced board, or replace the board? Anyone who rides airflow, please advise!!!

Maybe some wakeboarding lessons would help?

Thanks in advance,
Andrew B

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Postby Sushi » Wed Jul 23, 2003 9:16 pm

Did you follow a course or do you know people who can give you lessons ?

If not, I strongly encourage you to do so, you'll find that with a little help your board isn't that hard to ride after all. I don't own one myself, but I saw at least two people using an Airflow 162 as their first board, so it should be possible I think (even if other boards of the same size are easier to ride).

If you already followed a course during which you were able to start planing but are unable to do so on the Bic, then I'd advise you to change your board and go for an easier model.

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Beginner on advanced board: Bic Airflow 162

Postby andrewb » Wed Jul 23, 2003 10:58 pm

>Did you follow a course or do you know people who can give you lessons?
****
I didn't have a course (if you mean lessons).
I've had about 7 days on the water and I feel confident on a big board.
Last time on my 7'3" directional I even went up-wind.
It was my first try on a wake board, and I could water-start and go.
There was enough wind, being underpowered was not the issue.
I was falling roughly 5 sec after I was going (and I was plaining).
I'm not sure exactly what the problem was.
Everything happened very quickly.

> If not, I strongly encourage you to do so, you'll find that with
> a little help your board isn't that hard to ride after all.
> I don't own one myself, but I saw at least two people
> using an Airflow 162 as their first board, so it should
> be possible I think (even if other boards of the same
> size are easier to ride).
****
I heared that it's too narrow. That's why it's difficult to learn as
it's much easier to catch toe side on it. I'm not sure if this was the
problem I had though.

> If you already followed a course during which you were able
> to start planing but are unable to do so on the Bic,
> then I'd advise you to change your board and go
> for an easier model.
****
That's the question I'm trying to get the answer.
As I haven't tried any other wake board, I don't know if it's
really harder to learn on airflow. Would be nice if somebody
who has (or tried) airflow could compare.

Andrew B

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Postby dt » Thu Jul 24, 2003 12:35 am

I have not ridden an Airflow but I learned on a twin tip that was about 170cm long and have some comments.

I don't think it is easier to catch the toe side edge on a narrower board. It might take a bigger kite to get up on a narrower board but since you are getting up on it, that isn't the problem. A board longer than 162 would be easier for now but you would outgrow it fast. Once you start jumping your 162 will feel too big. So, I recommend you keep the board.

Twin tips feel unstable at first compared to directional boards because twin tips have much more rocker in the tails and they have smaller fins. I recommend huge fins at first because they make the board more stable and they make it easier to go upwind. They make it harder to turn but at this point that is the least of your worries. Once you can stay upwind with the larger fins then you should switch to the stock fins. How big are the stock fins? I recommend 2.5-3" fins for now.

Also, be patient, you will get the hang of the 162 real soon. One more thing, don't try to point too much up wind until you are up to speed and cruising along smoothly.

I hope that helps.

Doug

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Postby Hernan » Fri Jul 25, 2003 11:58 am

Andrew don't worry.
The Airflow 162 is a medium size twintip and you could learn and ride perfectly in that board. Is not a high wind board (forget the marketing bla, bla.), but you will need to be powered to get on plane. (12 knots on a 16-18 mts kite).

At 210 is not the perfect allround board. Something around 40 width is perfect at your size. (Dragon L, WaveTray 147, etc)

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Postby Djizasse » Fri Jul 25, 2003 2:47 pm

I have an Airflow, it is my first board.
It's a good board and it only costed 500 euros almost a year ago.
I didn't find it hard to get "used" to it, but i recently tried another twinTip with very "round" rails and i couldn't get used to it, maybe the same happened to you (in reverse).

I also tried a SS Jarvis and i noticed it "glued" on the water much more that the airflow, wich is more "loose" and easier to loose the rail on your jumps.
In rough chop it has to be kept on a leash, i mean, you have to manage the rail, when i start to plane i have to get in the "rail-digging" position to blast through the chop, it really makes a difference.

I'm completely happy with it, it's f*cking great when you get to know your board, its sweet spots, when will it loose grip, etc.. You'll know when you get to really know your board, trust me, you'll know.

The airflow 162 works for me, now it's up to you to decide if you want to give another try.

Feel free to ask anything about this board, i'll be glad to answer.

PS - I don't know what fins you're using, but i exchanged my old ones with the new Bic Airblades, 5cm, they're bigger, meanner and way better. I love them, after 6 months they don't have a scratch, trully top notch quality.

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Postby Djizasse » Fri Jul 25, 2003 2:49 pm

Hernan wrote:Andrew don't worry.
The Airflow 162 is a medium size twintip and you could learn and ride perfectly in that board. Is not a high wind board (forget the marketing bla, bla.), but you will need to be powered to get on plane. (12 knots on a 16-18 mts kite).

At 210 is not the perfect allround board. Something around 40 width is perfect at your size. (Dragon L, WaveTray 147, etc)
I'm 75Kg, with my Toro 14m i need 12knots to go upwind.
And you can jump even before going upwind :wink:

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Airflow 162

Postby SRV » Fri Jul 25, 2003 3:08 pm

Dont worry it is a beginner board very easy to ride and freindly.
Once u'll know waht ure doing u wont want that board its gonna be big.
as for the 20 knots bla bla----BULLSHIT at 20 your overpowerde with the board.
U can use it from 12 kn with 16 meter,we have a few guys using then but they complain on the high wind ability.


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