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 Post subject: Fridge Compressor Oil
PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2013 2:31 am 
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Location: Ottawa, Canada
I used to have a vacuum pump from a fridge compressor, and it had a bunch of oil in it, and seemed to give out a slight fine oil mist. After a while it died. I have a couple other compressors from the local scrap metal guy, and found one that seems to work. The only thing is, it does not seem to sound oily or spit or mist any oil at all. I suspect that this thing could have been lying on its side before I got it and that the oil all drained out. (This was too much of a shoddy operation for these guys to have actually drained the oil on purpose).

SO, the question is, do all fridge compressors show evidence of having oil in them? Should I add oil to this one? I have some compressor oil from an air compressor. Or do some compressors not need it? I would think they all need some kind of luubrication, and there's no way to check with a dipstick. Should I pour some in and see what happens? Or is it likely that I'm OK with what I have? I'm thinking I have more risk of it not working if I leave it without oil than if I add some. Sound right?

Thanks,
Peter


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 Post subject: Re: Fridge Compressor Oil
PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2013 3:29 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2011 5:37 pm
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Apparently the refrigerant used in these compressors has a lubricant
in it.

So -- i placed a one-way, (flapper-type Brass) Check-valve between the
pump and the holding tank . It seams to hold the Vacuum quite well when
the pump is off, so it must not leak.

http://www.valvemade.com/brass_check_valve.html

I un-screw the top on the valve and spray 5-7 seconds worth of WD-40 in the valve, then
close it before turning on the pump. Hold your breath while spraying !!!
((use the red tube supplied with the can of WD-40 so it doesn't atomize in the air))

The air gets sucked From the tank To the pump, so
the oil never sees the tank. I direct the exhaust from the Pump out my window with a
plastic tube so i don't have to smell it. The order of the Epoxy goes out the window
as well, so once i got a seal on the bag, the work-room doesn't stink any more.

This pump has worked just Fine now for nearly 20 years , but i Never forget the WD-40
because i don't want to find another refrigerator compressor.

Bille


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 Post subject: Re: Fridge Compressor Oil
PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2013 9:28 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:49 am
Posts: 1170
Location: shallow sea
foam-n-fibre wrote:
I used to have a vacuum pump from a fridge compressor, and it had a bunch of oil in it, and seemed to give out a slight fine oil mist. After a while it died. I have a couple other compressors from the local scrap metal guy, and found one that seems to work. The only thing is, it does not seem to sound oily or spit or mist any oil at all. I suspect that this thing could have been lying on its side before I got it and that the oil all drained out. (This was too much of a shoddy operation for these guys to have actually drained the oil on purpose).

SO, the question is, do all fridge compressors show evidence of having oil in them? Should I add oil to this one? I have some compressor oil from an air compressor. Or do some compressors not need it? I would think they all need some kind of luubrication, and there's no way to check with a dipstick. Should I pour some in and see what happens? Or is it likely that I'm OK with what I have? I'm thinking I have more risk of it not working if I leave it without oil than if I add some. Sound right?
Thanks,
Peter

you should add some oil to fridge compressor if you want it to last. usually about 20grams is enough. compressor oil is fine. these compressors are designed to work in closed circulation system, so no dipsticks and no oiling holes. if you see no oil mist getting out then it is time to add some oil.
if you are using hermetic fridge compressor make sure it is with the original thermal cut-out. these compressors are not designed to work long hours and have no dedicated cooling surfaces. if overheated it could seize or burn its windings


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 Post subject: Re: Fridge Compressor Oil
PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:27 am 
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Joined: Sat May 17, 2008 3:44 pm
Posts: 1120
Location: DownUnder/Brazil cumbuco-oceanview.com
Bille wrote:
Apparently the refrigerant used in these compressors has a lubricant
in it.

So -- i placed a one-way, (flapper-type Brass) Check-valve between the
pump and the holding tank . It seams to hold the Vacuum quite well when
the pump is off, so it must not leak.

http://www.valvemade.com/brass_check_valve.html

I un-screw the top on the valve and spray 5-7 seconds worth of WD-40 in the valve, then
close it before turning on the pump. Hold your breath while spraying !!!
((use the red tube supplied with the can of WD-40 so it doesn't atomize in the air))

The air gets sucked From the tank To the pump, so
the oil never sees the tank. I direct the exhaust from the Pump out my window with a
plastic tube so i don't have to smell it. The order of the Epoxy goes out the window
as well, so once i got a seal on the bag, the work-room doesn't stink any more.

This pump has worked just Fine now for nearly 20 years , but i Never forget the WD-40
because i don't want to find another refrigerator compressor.

Bille


Hi Bille,

Usually these one way valves you are using have a rubber and/or O-Ring to seal. Your WD-40 will kill them after a while. So be careful there with your WD-40.

Cheers
Caesar 8)


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 Post subject: Re: Fridge Compressor Oil
PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 4:30 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2011 5:37 pm
Posts: 1795
Caesar wrote:
...

Hi Bille,

Usually these one way valves you are using have a rubber and/or O-Ring to seal. Your WD-40 will kill them after a while. So be careful there with your WD-40.

Cheers
Caesar 8)


Ya had me worried , so i took the top off & looked ; mine was All Brass !!

From now on, when i suggest that part to people, i'll be sure to mention
what you said . -------------------------------------that's Caesar's Law !! :D :thumb:

Bille


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