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some one please help a big guy out

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seanblakley
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Postby seanblakley » Wed Aug 14, 2002 7:52 am

Hey,
I'm new to this forum and have a question. I want to get into Kite Surfing, but don't knnow if I can. I just turned 18 and I'm 6'6" 265 lbs (expect to be 285 in a few months). I lift weights alot, that is why I'm so heavy (not fat). I'm wondering if I am too big for this sport. A lot of people have told me that I would have a hard time bacause of my size. I live in miami and all the guys I have watched are no larger that 200 lbs. I want to be able to get air like the small guys do. So do I have a chance?

thanks a lot!,
Sean

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MissionMan
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Postby MissionMan » Wed Aug 14, 2002 8:08 am

Shouldn't be a problem, you just need a bigger kite than I or someone else is.

If a small guy is taking out a 9.4 cabrinha, you could probably take out a 12.2 and if you are really that big, a larger board woudl probably help you out.

If you still have questions, go for a couple of lessons. Kite instructors have wide ranges of kites and boards, so it might help you out with the sizing process a bit as well. You can see what is strong enough to get you going, and build your kite quiver form there.

Guest

Postby Guest » Wed Aug 14, 2002 10:37 am

Hi. I'm about 260 pounds. I ride a 1510 arc which has a projected of about 11m. Can go in 10 or 12 knots. Board 7' Naish Sky Pirate directional (which is big). Building a 175 by 44 cm twin tip for 20 knots plus. For light (a few small whitecaps) winds you want at least a 20m inflatable and a big board.

One thing I've done is build my own lines, 300 to 330 kg (660 to 730 pound) dyneema line, 30m long. All four lines the same strength. Haven't broken a line for ages.

Windsurfed for 10 years, broke tons of gear, kitesurfed 2 seasons, broke a few lines and one bar.

Once you get past the learner stage you will be able to add 5 to 10 knots (or mph) to the quoted upper windrange for the kite because of your size.

I've got a friend who's about the same weight as me, he rides a 22m cabrinha and goes fine.


email or msn-messenger me at

craig_knights
@
hotmail
.
com

if ya want a bit more info


Craig

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Postby Guest » Wed Aug 14, 2002 11:11 am

I'm the other big boy from Dunedin... aboput 250 pounds...
I fly a Cabrinha 9.4 (Which still feels big on some days- like last Sat ay Craig!)
and a Cabrinha 15.5 (which feels big every day)
Boards I have an underground directional 6'... which is bigish... and a Cabrinha Prankster 150.... No problems with size....

Dwight
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Postby Dwight » Wed Aug 14, 2002 11:21 am

Those big sky pirate Naish boards were selling for $300.00 NEW this spring. Ask around and you may be able to get one. They didn't sell well because they are too big for most people, but perfect for you.

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murdoc
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Postby murdoc » Wed Aug 14, 2002 11:29 am

well, the only problem you'll get is the low end.

in 8-10knots, when the small dudes get to start, you'll sit on the beach and watch.
but your windrange's not smaller, only moved upwards.
so you can still hold a kite when the small dudes watch you because there's too much wind for them :wink:

it's very important to take lessons!
when kiteboarding you may not only harm yourself, but put others into danger when doing mistakes.

learning by try'n error's a very very painful way - and you can profit of the errors others made for you....

a friend of mine (we learned the hard way, cause there were no schools back in '2000)
broke 8 ribs, i broke my wrist and we both had
several lighter injuries that were 95% totally unneccesary.......

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RickI
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Postby RickI » Wed Aug 14, 2002 11:56 am

Hello Sean,

You will have to sit out the calms longer than some riders in the 160 lbs. and under catagory. You have the advantage in Miami of sheltered water in Biscayne Bay. Calm water takes a few knots off the wind requirements for planning. I would plan on getting a long directional board and maybe even a converted long surfboard for the frequent marginal days in the area. Of course we are entering into Fall and the stronger frontal winds should be returning. If it is blowing near 18 kt. or better you should be fine with a large enough kite, board and some good instruction. Riding in suboptimal winds is pretty technical, learning how to manage this on your own is not that easy making lessons a good idea. It is in the frequent 10 kt. or less conditions that you will have difficulties.

You need to hookup for lessons particularly to help you figure out how to manage a higher weight in our lighter winds. Otherwise it could be a short look at an otherwise outstanding sport followed by moving on to something else. I would suggest contacting Christopher at miamikiteboarding.com. He runs a good operation out in the bay on sand bars from a pontoon boat. You will advance more quickly as you don't have to worry about stopping to avoid beaches, trees, bystanders, etc. I am at a loss to identify other suitable learning areas in Miami that are free of restrictions or hazards for new riders.

<IMG SRC="http://www.falconsafety.com/marine/products/prod_detail.asp?id=128">

Rick Iossi

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RickI on 2002-08-14 13:01 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RickI on 2002-10-25 19:40 ]</font>

seanblakley
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Postby seanblakley » Wed Aug 14, 2002 9:10 pm

Hey,
thanks for all the help guys. I can get a new 2001 Cabrinah 15.5 Black Tip for $600, should I get it? I was also thinking of the 175 twin tip Pickle Fork non-directional. But I guess I need a directional board? Thanks again.


-Sean

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: seanblakley on 2002-08-14 22:12 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: seanblakley on 2002-08-14 22:13 ]</font>

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Postby Dwight » Thu Aug 15, 2002 12:11 pm

On 2002-08-14 22:10, seanblakley wrote:
Hey,
thanks for all the help guys. I can get a new 2001 Cabrinah 15.5 Black Tip for $600, should I get it? I was also thinking of the 175 twin tip Pickle Fork non-directional. But I guess I need a directional board? Thanks again.


-Sean


No don't get it. Last summer I tried all the monster kites. I was trying to find one that was fun to ride. Monster kites get better each year.

I tired the 16.4 Air Blast, the 14.9 Free Air, the 18.9 RRD, the 15.5 Black Tip, the 23.5 ARX, and the 22.5 Rhino.

The 15.5 black Tip was the worst of all these. It had the least low end power and worst jumping potential.

All of these big kites can be found cheap on the used market. The 14.9 Free Air was the best for relaunching. The 22.5 Rhino is the most powerful one that still jumped half way decent. The RRD 18.9 jumps good too. I didn't like the 16.4 Air Blast. I thought the low end grunt was poor for it's size. The 23.5 ARX kites are dirt cheap because they don't jump at all and require great effort to pump up.

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RickI
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Postby RickI » Thu Aug 15, 2002 2:14 pm

Sean,

I would take the lessons before buying a kite or a board. Your instructors will have to confront the question of rigging you up with what may work. You will be able to checkout various systems at no additional cost. By the end of training you should have your own well informed opinion about what to buy. The chances of your making the wrong purchase will be diminished by this point.



Rick Iossi


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RickI on 2002-10-25 19:43 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RickI on 2002-10-25 19:43 ]</font>


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