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Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

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abel
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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby abel » Fri Oct 06, 2017 8:26 pm

Struts =Ribs
Mast= Sword
:cool2:

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby revhed » Sat Oct 07, 2017 9:13 am

abel wrote:
Fri Oct 06, 2017 8:26 pm
Struts =Ribs
Mast= Sword
:cool2:
?
R H

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby revhed » Sat Oct 07, 2017 9:53 am

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strut

"A strut is a structural component designed to resist longitudinal compression. Struts provide outwards-facing support in their lengthwise direction, which can be used to keep two other components separate"

" struts are used in "load bearing" applications "

" struts..sometimes even to form, the main functional airframe."

"Struts have also been widely used for purely structural reasons to attach..... loads."

"The mast...is a tall spar......Its purposes include carrying sail.....giving necessary height"

http://www.webster-dictionary.org/definition/strut

" In general, any piece of a frame which resists thrust or pressure in the direction of its own length.
3. Any part of a machine or structure, of which the principal function is to hold things apart; a brace subjected to compressive stress

To hold apart.

http://www.webster-dictionary.org/definition/mast

A pole, or long, strong, round piece of timber, or spar, set upright in a boat or vessel, to sustain the sails, yards, rigging,

WordNet Dictionary
Noun 1. Mast - a vertical spar for supporting sails

viewtopic.php?f=196&t=2388064&p=878083& ... st#p878083

viewtopic.php?f=196&t=2389925&p=905432& ... st#p905432

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby coffeeking » Sat Oct 07, 2017 10:16 am

Would have thought they come closer to being battens in sailing terms, they do exactly the job of a batten.

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby BWD » Sat Oct 07, 2017 3:59 pm

RH as a nonnative English speaker you are missing the hierarchy of meaning that prevails in both technical and casual English usage.
When there is a mast,it is either THE main structural component of an entire object or one of its principal sub-parts, exemplified by sailboats radio towers, etc. Struts are usually multiple and are usually smaller parts of the whole of smaller parts of a sub-part: car suspension struts, space frame components, individual parts of furniture, buildings etc.
A google image search for the terms "strut" and "mast" will help you understand.

Another key, maybe the most important, is that a mast elevates things into the air.
That's what the hydrofoil mast does. ;)
Its purpose is not really to push the wing deep in the water, it holds the rider up!
Therefore mast, mât.

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby Peter_Frank » Sat Oct 07, 2017 4:40 pm

Jackie Treehorn wrote:
Fri Oct 06, 2017 3:07 pm
mast [mast, mahst]

noun
1.
Nautical.

a spar or structure rising above the hull and upper portions of a ship or boat to hold sails, spars, rigging, booms, signals, etc., at some point on the fore-and-aft line, as a foremast or mainmast.
any of a number of individual spars composing such a structure, as a topmast supported on trestletrees at the head of a lower mast.
any of various portions of a single spar that are beside particular sails, as a top-gallant mast and royal mast formed as a single spar.

2.
Also called pillar. the upright support of a jib crane.
3.
any upright pole, as a support for an aerial, a post in certain cranes, etc

I have checked, and yes indeed the upright part of a crane, carrying the platform with the operator (rider), is called a "mast" yes.

So it makes sense, having a little wing just under the water as the base, with a tall "mast" above the water to carry the platform and rider up in the air.

Whenever somebody who have never seen a hydrofoil before, asks "what is THAT", I explain that it is only the little horizontal wing that is in the water, lifting me up, and the long thing (I point at the mast) is NOT a fin or keel like everyone thinks at first, but only to support holding me and the board up free in the air above the water :thumb:

Strut is also a correct word, but as said before, this word is not used in our language whereas mast is the very same word and easy to understand, and it makes okay sense in general in both english and non-english countries.

Good thread (if bored at least ha haa) - I thought "mast" was an adapted word, but it is also correct according to above definitions, just as the word "strut" can be considered correct, for the vertical part of a hydrofoil.

But a "modern" hydrofoil, opposed to old hydrofoil passenger boats and similar, dont have much in common, so on the old ones the sometimes diagonal supports are often called spars and struts.

Would say the major difference is somewhat that struts are often not that big (or tall) compared to what they are holding or mounted inside/outside, and typically not a major part of what they are holding, whereas masts are a major part.
This is the typical distinction IMO and experience, that makes one choose words like pole/mast instead of spar/strut/rod.

It makes sense to differ those IMO, as for us the mast is such a major part of a hydrofoil with a visual look that got nothing in common with these classic hydrofoils:

Image



Mast or pole is used about a "thing" holding something or someone up in the air:

"Mast is a spar or structure rising above the hull and upper portions of a ship to hold sails, spars, rigging, etc".
"Mast is any upright pole, as a support for an aerial, a post in certain cranes, etc".


Strut or rod or spar is used about a "thing" connecting parts, stiffening parts, usually smaller than a mast, compared to the whole unit:

"strut is a structural piece designed to resist pressure in the direction of its length".
"strut is a strong rod, usually made from metal or wood, that helps to hold something such as a vehicle or building together".
"strut is a rod or bar forming part of a framework and designed to resist compression".


Both words can be considered correct, so no reason to rant one or another expression :rollgrin:

PS: Aaah, okay BWD, you summarized the same in a few words, while I was writing, cool :thumb:

8) Peter

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby Horst Sergio » Sat Oct 07, 2017 5:12 pm

BWD wrote:
Sat Oct 07, 2017 3:59 pm
... as a nonnative English speaker you are missing ...
Its purpose is not really to push the wing deep in the water, it holds the rider up!
Therefore mast, mât.
So thanks for clarifying, from now on I am on the mast side. :D :thumb:

Always wondered if the view native speakers here, which have to go through all our basic, broken englisch are crying in the night. :lol:

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby FLandOBX » Sat Oct 07, 2017 8:19 pm

If you say mast (not strut), you'd refer to your rig as a sail (not kite), and you'd call yourself a sailboarder (not kiteboarder). I can't go there. :-?

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby Kamikuza » Sun Oct 08, 2017 2:41 am

LE = mast

Thanks for clearing that up

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Re: Who calls LEIs vertical structural elements "masts"?

Postby joyrider1 » Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:00 am

Name follows function? I don`t really care what name it is and I don`t want to create more confusion, but: In all the discussion there is one thing I always missed: Besides the lifting/connecting function there is another major function: basically steering left/right and up/down or a combination of both depending on how much the total KBHF is tilted. In KBHF this seems different to other devices where the strut has no such function. So in KBHF it definitely has the function of something like a rudder or fin to me. Think of a strut/mast with theoretically no chord at all: You would begin to slide around sideways. You simply need a certain amount of resistance sideways compared to the direction you are travelling. The mast/strut keeps your vehicle on track. The strut/mast somewhat does what the wing does, just in in the vertical dimension.
My words won`t solve this name discussion, just wanted to mention: There is way more to the strut/mast than just connecting the board and wing/fuselage.


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