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 Post subject: PROPERLY ANCHOR YOUR KITE!!!
PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 3:12 am 
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Just saw this on the BKSA list:

http://www.sickair.tv/forum/display_top ... Position=1

A 60 year old man apparently was wrapped and dragged along the beach by a poorly anchored kite and suffered a broken rib.

1. Do not leave kites rigged and unattended.

2. At a minimum, always take the lines off of unattended kites in light to moderate winds. MAKE SURE you have piled adequate sand over several points along the kite.

3. A BETTER APPROACH and an essential one if winds are strong or gusty, is to deflate your leading edge and roll, tie your kite if you leave it unattended. Afterward, thoroughly anchor the rolled kite. Rolling your kite ROUTINELY when you leave it unattended will also make it last longer and help to retain value for resale. As others have pointed out, you will cut down on UV and wind flapping related deterioration. These things can really take the new look off of your kite, so if for no other reason, roll your kite for the MONEY!

These sort of accidents are EASILY AVOIDED! Use common sense and look after yourself, others and our access, don't take things for granted.

The newspaper account for the accident follows (thanks for the link Paul!):

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/3027134.stm
-----------------------------
Man injured by surf kite
-----------------------------

Mr Addicoat and his wife walk their dogs on Long Rock beach every day
A Cornishman is recovering from injuries after being carried into the air and across a beach after he was tangled in a surf kite.
Quinton Addicoat, 60, broke a rib and needed hospital treatment.

The incident happened while Mr Addicoat and his wife Margaret were exercising their three dogs on Long Rock beach, near Penzance.

Mr Addicoat, who has a spinal condition and diabetes, became entangled in the parachute of a surf kite which blew across the beach, trapping him and then lifting him into the air.

"The next thing I knew I was inside one of these kites and I just got lifted up into the air," said Mr Addicoat.

"My wife reckons I was carried about 10-15 metres, I didn't know exactly what was happening.

"When it came down it dropped me on the sand rather heavily on the right-hand side, and I was pretty sure I did some damage to my ribs."

Mr Addicoat was taken to hospital and treated for a broken rib and bruising.

Kite surfing is growing in popularity and there is concern about this accident and other near misses.

In another case, a kite blew across a main road next to the beach.

"I personally have witnessed kites that have been in the air and had they come down would have come across the main highway," said John Tremelling, Penwith District Council's Beach Safety Officer.

"I think that's quite a serious issue."

But Mr Addicoat said he does not want the surfers banned but believes they should be restricted to an area away from walkers.

Ben Jones from Cornwall's Extreme Academy, where kite surfing is taught, said Mr Addicoat was "quite right" to call for tougher safety controls.

"It's down to the collective kite-surfing community to look after other beach users and other water users," said Mr Jones.

"The unruly few who don't stick to the British Kite Surfing Association guidelines do bring the sport a bad name."



I just came across another report from the UK on a related subject:

"Also general carnage here on the beach with kites being blown over beach as people thought a few "rocks" would hold kites down - not a good idea as highest gust here was 44mph at 15:15."


Last edited by RickI on Thu Jul 03, 2003 1:36 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 2:18 pm 
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I remember a notable incident that happened in South Africa a while back involving a runaway kite that was launched by a dog (?), and caused a bit of chaos. Anyway, higher winds and loose kites are no joke and to are to be avoided. I have watched fairly heavily anchored kites unanchor themselves in solo launching position in high winds. If they are anchored leading edge down they might be a bit more stable in higher winds. Still nothing is as stable as deflating the leading edge, rolling, tying and anchoring the resulting ripstop nylon burrito.

Have others seen or heard about other incidents involving kites coming unanchored and flying off downwind to cause problems?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 4:24 pm 
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...and in doing so have a kite that lasts a longer due to less UV damage!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 7:27 pm 
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Quote:
"RickI" wrote:
Have others seen or heard about other incidents involving kites coming unanchored and flying off downwind to cause problems?


Yes I've seen several kites come unanchored. Only by sheer dumb luck did they not actually cause problems. What happens here is if you fold the tip to sand it, the wind can shift enough to make the unsanded tip flip up & over, often dumping the sand off. Solutions include just not folding the tip before sanding, AND/or angling the unsanded tip closer to straight downwind (instead of across the wind).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 7:38 pm 
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kiteboarder@pacbell.net wrote:
Quote:
"RickI" wrote:
Have others seen or heard about other incidents involving kites coming unanchored and flying off downwind to cause problems?


Yes I've seen several kites come unanchored. Only by sheer dumb luck did they not actually cause problems. What happens here is if you fold the tip to sand it, the wind can shift enough to make the unsanded tip flip up & over, often dumping the sand off. Solutions include just not folding the tip before sanding, AND/or angling the unsanded tip closer to straight downwind (instead of across the wind).


Normally the winds have to be pretty strong, probably a common thing in Cabrillo but a more rare event where I typically ride. So, I expect you have to deal with those conditions far more than I do. Anyway, I always layout the kite parallel with the wind to minimize movement and the tendency to lift in winds. The kite always pivots very nicely into position during launch from this position upon tensioning the lines. Still, if stronger winds are on the bouncing of the downwind portion of the kite can actually work the kite out from under the pile of sand on the bent over portion. You can be standing there and watch all this and fly forward to grab the kite before it flings off out of control down the beach. I have seen this happen even with a trench beneath the folded portion and a LOT of sand ballast. In the stronger stuff assisted launch seems to be the way to go for added certainty about avoiding a runaway kite prior to the intended launch.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2003 7:57 pm 
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Quote:
"RickI" wrote:
Normally the winds have to be pretty strong...


Hmm. Maybe not, since in light wind areas riders typically use less sand.

Quote:
Still, if stronger winds are on the bouncing of the downwind portion of the kite can actually work the kite out from under the pile of sand on the bent over portion.


And/or the sand can eventually blow off.

Quote:
In the stronger stuff assisted launch seems to be the way to go


Or at least extra sand. In strong wind the kite has no problem lifting 40 pounds of sand.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2003 1:47 pm 
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Thanks for the input guys. The original posting has been modified to include your comments. Also, Carlo at ikiteboard.com posted this followup article to the original piece on the accident. We really need to AVOID complaints, start by using LOTS OF DISTANCE and little, better NO "attitude" to try to secure access. There aren't a lot of kiteboarders, but there are a LOT of other people out there aside from us. We would do well to keep low key and not stir up trouble with "attitude", after all who is likely to win and who is likely to lose. In the end, numbers can count for a great deal.

Visiting kiteboarders are being mentioned a bit TOO often as a contributing cause to access problems in more than a few areas. Guys, don't leave home and screw up access for other riders. It may well reach back to where you live one of these days. Reseach local practices, guidlines and restrictions BEFORE ever hitting the beach. Good luck in the UK, it sounds like things are heating up.



"It is one of the fastest growing extreme sports to hit UK waters in recent years.
But the kitesurfing phenomenon has divided one small seaside community.

The row between kitesurfers, residents and golfers on Hayling Island, Hampshire, has reached the point that local councillors are now pushing for powers to ban the sport.

Members of Havant Borough Council want the government to bring in a new by-law that will enable the authority to bring the kitesurfers back down to earth.

They have acted amid concerns that members of the public are being put at risk from out-of-control kites.


The kitesurfers say safety is a priority
Residents have also expressed anger at their treatment by visiting kitesurfers, who have been labelled as abusive and aggressive.

Committee members of the Hayling Golf Club have been active in pushing for an all-out ban.

The club owns a stretch of seafront on the island but has allowed the public to continue using the beach.

The "duty of care" the club owes to beach-users could see it held liable under their insurance if any injuries occur there, says secretary Chris Cavill.

We are not yobbish surf bums

Kitesurfer Phil Elborough
He told BBC News Online: "The official line at the moment is that we cannot afford to take the risk.

"Kiteboarders per se we have no problem with.

"They are attractive to look at and they do not interfere with the golfers. But the problems are with people landing and taking off.

"If there is a gust of wind or the person is inexperienced they often cannot control the kite and they tumble out of the sky.


If the ban were brought in, it would be the UK's first
"We have had incidents when people have been caught in the head or shoulder."

Hayling Island has seen the numbers of kitesurfers using its waterfront increase over the past two years.

The Hayling Kitesurfing Association estimates there are about 140 regular users of the beach, attracted to the area by its sand bar and good winds.

At its peak, the association sends out newsletters to around 600 people.

'Responsible adults'

Chairman Phil Elborough, who also owns a local kitesurf store and has been a kitesurfer for the past four years, said: "If someone is actually kitesurfing on the water, going along, they are in total control.

"If they were not they would not be able to do it.

"In two years of busy kitesurfing in Hayling - and that is 365 days a year - there have been no accidents involving a member of the public and that's partly because we are self-policing.

"If you arrive on the beach as a new beginner we spot you immediately and we are straight onto you, making sure you know what you are doing.

"I know all of the people down there. We are not yobs - most of us are middle-aged guys with kids.

"You need £1,500 just to kit yourself out, that means you have to have a proper job.

There's no by-law nationally and no other local authority has brought in a ban on kitesurfing

Tim Slater, council spokesman
"We are not yobbish surf bums. What I am trying to say is that we are responsible adults."

So confident is he of the kitesurfers' safety record that he said: "As a club we are willing to pay the increase in the golf club's insurance.

"I do not know what it would be. If it was within our grasp we would be quite happy to pay for it."

But at the moment the future for kitesurfing on Hayling Island remains uncertain.

So far two committees on the borough council have passed resolutions calling for the ban to be put in place.

Decision to come

It now has only to pass through a meeting of the full council before official calls are made to the Home Office.

The council's acting director of community services, Tim Slater, said: "At the moment the council could put up advisory signs on any activity there but could not enforce them.

"What the by-law would do is give legal power to the authority. It would make it an offence to kitesurf in the area the by-law applied to.

"If the council passes the recommendation, there will be quite a long process.

"There's no by-law nationally and no other local authority has brought in a ban on kitesurfing."

A meeting of the full council will decide in July as to whether to push the government to bring in the by-law.

taken from : http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/engl ... 996868.stm


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