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 Post subject: 800 FT. LOFTING
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:45 am 
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Back in March 2002 there was a remarkable lofting in Cabarete ...

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From: http://216.92.244.20/pictures/patoKingO ... /index.htm




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32. Incident# 3 3 02 "Record Lofting" Location: Cabarete, Dominican Republic - Updated 7.25.05

Date of Incident March 2002 Participant account included: Yes Number of independent accounts: 4


Image
The lofting occurred in the farther portion of the bay.
From: http://www.hispaniola.com/

Summary

A 155 lb. (70 kg) kiteboarding instructor of about 2 1/2 years experience on a four-month holiday in Cabarete was rigged with an RRD 11.9 m kite. The wind had been consistently side shore 10 to 15 kts. He noticed a black line of clouds or squall moving in to shore. He came into shore at the west section of Cabarete Bay at Bozo Beach. [b]He lowered his kite to within 3 to 5 m (10 to 16 ft.), off the ground for an assisted landing. He was then hit by a violent wind gust, that he described as an “explosion.â€


Last edited by RickI on Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:37 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:52 am 
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Commentary

This rider was incredibly lucky to have come through a flight about 100 ft. in height, over a horizontal distance of over 800 ft. moving at a speed over ground estimated to be on the order of 35 kts. plus, alive and largely uninjured.

The boost in wind speed from 15 kts. to over 50 kts. equates to over ten times the lifting kite power. So if 15 kts. could easily lift this 70 kg. rider, the reality of what 50 kts. could do is astonishing. This rider was lofted by another squall in Europe almost two years ago into a rough landing on the beach.

Another rider at Kitebeach in Cabarete reportedly was lofted into a palm tree and was left hanging on to the tree when he lost his kite. Three other kiteboarders lost their kites, which ended up hanging in two trees and one power line. I was told that no white caps or other surface disturbance signs were noted in advance of the storm cloud. Those that were looking for changing sea conditions and thought "no strong wind was coming", were sadly proved to be very wrong in this case.

Finally, on a very serious note, two girls were admitted to the hospital at the same time as this rider. They had been out parasailing off Puerto Plata about 15 miles to the west when the squall hit. One girl was reportedly killed and the other paralyzed. Violent squall winds are a serious hazard to more than just kiteboarders.


The conventional wisdom on how to avoid lofting is to keep your kite low while near hard objects. If you are caught in a powerful wind gust this technique may do little to help you avoid injury. Apparently in this case either the very high wind speed and/or perhaps inadvertent control bar inputs sent the kite flying up from the ground fully into the power zone. With lower gusts it is expected that violent dragging would occur. Not in this case. Dragging could have easily caused serious injury or death considering the wind speed and associated kite force. Logic dictates that the only proper, reasonably safe way to deal with this situation would be to never be in it in the first place. If squalls are coming, land your kite very soon. Squalls of this level of violence can occur in various parts of the Caribbean and SE USA particularly during the warmer months. They may also be reasonably common in many other parts of the world. If you see a squall coming in, you have no idea whether the wind will die, reverse, boost 5 kts. or 50 kts. or all of the above.

I am reminded of a story about Luftwaffe glider pilots trying to learn about conditions inside cumulonimbus storm clouds just prior to WWII. Of the original group of 35 pilots I recall that two survived interacting with the incredible violence inside these clouds. Some things are best left alone. Other kiteboarders have been injured by squall winds in several other accounts in this section. Threatening incoming storm clouds and squalls should be avoided by kiteboarders at all costs.


The squall that caused this lofting was recently identified as resembling a shelf cloud. Several of these were seen around Florida during the recent passage of Hurricane Dennis in 2005. Some kiteboarders may have been hit by strong gusts into the 40 to 50 kt. range when the clouds passed over. Shelf clouds are also seen not that uncommonly at other times of the year in various parts of the world. The first two photos were taken in Florida in the last year.

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From: http://icons.wunderground.com
A shelf cloud off the Florida Panhandle with the passing of Hurricane Dennis.

Image
This actually looks like it might be a "wall cloud." These clouds though similar in some ways to shelf clouds are also associated with violent weather including tornados.
From: fksa.org

Image
From: http://apollo.lsc.vsc.edu/classes/met130/

Image
From: http://www.chaseday.com/

Shelf clouds are associatied with gust fronts the passage of which passage is noted by:

* calm winds
* then (sometimes excessively) gusty winds and a temp drop
* then rain

Question: If you saw one of these coming your way, you'd land, right? Just make sure you land well in time to have everything secured before it hits.

More about severe weather at:
http://apollo.lsc.vsc.edu/classes/met13 ... index.html

Ideas about weather planning and monitoring for kiteboarding appear at:
http://fksa.org/viewtopic.php?t=130

FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
Rick Iossi


Last edited by RickI on Tue Jul 26, 2005 4:17 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 8:19 am 
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i dont understand how he broke limbs and carried on breaking limbs on the tree, and then was kitesurfing two days later...

please ammend?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 8:33 am 
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Maybe the tree was breaking limbs (=branches)?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 12:14 pm 
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jaapd wrote:
Maybe the tree was breaking limbs (=branches)?


That was my understanding. The rider broke a pine bough or branch on impact with the pine tree. I would not like to break the larger diameter limb of a hard wood tree by comparison. This has happened before.

I spoke to this rider three years ago by phone twice. His impressions and those of others that I communicated with in Cabarete are contained in the account. I wasn't there but four people were that contributed to the writeup in 2002. He has posted here before. We might even hear from him this time.

I imagine given the speed he was traveling at it would have been hard to survive hitting much else on dry land other than a yielding pine tree? It was a remarkable accident and tale of survival.

NOTE: I have seen photos of shelf clouds from many areas of the world, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Caribbean, France, UK, many parts of the USA, etc.. Just google.com "shelf cloud" and your location to see what might show up. Also, shelf clouds are not the only type of weather that can throw out strong, dangerous gusts. Know your weather guys, you're in the game now. Weather is a large part of our sport.

FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 4:16 pm 
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What other weather stories have folks experienced out there? We have had a few in Florida recently. Early, correct reaction or better still, avoidance in the first place, have been important factors.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 7:49 pm 
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Still being VERY new to kiteboarding, I just can't see the logic in approaching the beach hooked in to land. You point it out in item "C" above - launch and land unhooked! If something bad happens, swallow your pride and let go of the bar!?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 8:04 pm 
Cirrus wrote:
Still being VERY new to kiteboarding, I just can't see the logic in approaching the beach hooked in to land. You point it out in item "C" above - launch and land unhooked! If something bad happens, swallow your pride and let go of the bar!?


So how does this taste of reality speak in favor of beach lessons?

How in the NAME of all things Stupid and Natural do beach lessons

make any sense at all if your plannig on flying a kitesurf kite??

I mean it's just fucking nuts to let total rookies handle a kitesurfing kite on the beach and call it instruction.

it's just stupid, naive, bad practise, it's bad instruction at best.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 8:17 pm 
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I also have a decent pic of a wall cloud in Panama City, Fl from the passing of the second set of feeder bands of Dennis. I took the photo after kitesurfing in the bay that day. There were two of us on the water, and the other guy's father was in radio contact from an area 15 miles SE of us. He gave us warning when the system arrived.

We could see it in the distance, and we both wisely landed safely and calmly. By the time I had finished packing up, I took the photo and then hit the road. The sky opened up and all hell broke loose. I saw two major car accidents on the way home. People were in a panic.

I'm on the road right now, but I'll post it when I get home. It shows the bay, blue sky on the left (West) and a line of dark clouds on the right (East). It's just a phone pic, but not too bad.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 8:26 pm 
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Cirrus wrote:
Still being VERY new to kiteboarding, I just can't see the logic in approaching the beach hooked in to land. You point it out in item "C" above - launch and land unhooked! If something bad happens, swallow your pride and let go of the bar!?


Convenience often governs human behavior even when what is convenient is a bad idea. We have been talking about launch and landing unhooked for several years. Because it is a little less convenient people sometimes don't even bother to try it much less do it on a regular basis. As a result, there are more severe accidents.

Practice "just letting go" of your bar. Some guys hold on to the bar and get dragged into the accident despite being unhooked. Ideally, the bar should be just yanked out of your hands. If you are wearing gloves you might not even lose the odd fingernail either. Pride should have nothing to do with it. There are folks no longer among us that made the main mistake of waiting too long.

FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
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