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Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

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sarc
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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby sarc » Mon Apr 14, 2014 8:10 am

"Peter: I learned that being able to jibe in flat water is not the same as in waves. Probably just my excuse, but the wave interval seemed to close for my slow jibes. I now have a better idea of what I need to work on. I do want to be able to pull this off on a surfboard eventually, so I will keep at it."

Have you tried a slam jybe? It's the same as windsurfing:
- Slow down and drop your butt in the water
- Swing the kite to the new direction and waterstart going toeside
- Switch your feet whenever convenient - ether right away or ride toeside away from wave and then switch

This jybe takes 2 seconds to complete...

Tiago1973
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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby Tiago1973 » Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:23 am

for those moments you know you are going to be swallow by a wave just dive through it, head first, the rest will follow. much better than taking the hit


beware of the whitewater, there´s not much fluctuation there

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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby maurice_k » Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:22 am

Hello,

Well, a lot of people here gave you the right advise. Turn your kite then your board.
But depending on the swell and the direction of the wind it is wisely to stay on the wave. With underlooping your kite it will give you the right angle then to stay on.

http://www.seabreezekiteclub.com/

Thanks

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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby mede » Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:58 pm

You can prepare in flat water:

Vary the radius of the surfboard, from high speed long radius gradually to very aggressive short radius.

Make sure to train the jibe with foot switch after the turn.
Get in tune with the kite. Kite goes first, then ACTIVELY move your body to toe side, carve it.
Time the foot change the way that when your kite just starts to fly up again (this is the moment when you don't have pressure in the kite), you switch feet.
Make sure that your turn is finished about 3/4 of 180 degrees at this time.
Have a plan how you switch feet (which foot first). Take only 2 steps, don't tripple around.

When you master this in flat water, you will eventually master it in the wave (just learn to read the wave to see when to initiate the turn)

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windyway
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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby windyway » Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:00 am

Peter_Frank wrote:Dont ride toeside - you will lose upwind very fast, you will be tired on your rear leg, and you will not be able to cope with breaking waves at all :o

Just JIBE, no matter if surfing around or turning the board by hand. Peter


Peter, there is more to the story.

Twin tippers only learn heelside.
But a surfboard is 50-50 .... heelside AND toeside.

You can learn to go upwind and jump from toeside.
It is a very useful skill that you should learn and master.
Don't avoid toeside. You just need more practice to be a better all around rider.

Once you master toeside, you will not need to jibe.
Jibbing is just an option. Surfers don't jibe. windsurfers jibe.

I ride Onshore, offshore, regular or goofy.
Some days, I never jibe.... Other days I do 100's of jibes.
Practice, practice. It all works.
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alpower
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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby alpower » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:10 pm

What seems to be missing from all this advise is that you were riding a 9m kite in 30kts of wind. That is quite a challenge for anyone on a strapless surf board! When riding a twin tip most people choose a kite based on being nicely powered in the lulls and lit in the gusts. Strapless, you need to choose a kite that lets you be nicely powered in the gusts and relying on riding the board flat and using the fins for drive in the lulls. Otherwise when you get on a wave, you get so much apparent wind it will just pull you off the board. On flat water it's easy to ride a surf board like a TT. Practice with a smaller kite.

I would also say you should have left your TT at home. If you dabble with a surfy and then fall back on your TT you will never get good. You had no fall back when learning to kite, take it away again when learning to ride a surf board. You may get worked a few times, but if the surf is big, just stay away from where it's really breaking and ride the swells instead. Replace your TT with a skim board for the flat water days. Most importantly ride any waves every chance you get. They don't need to be big but you need to get the feel for getting over the top of them and timing your practicing jibing in them.

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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby KYLakeKiter » Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:16 pm

I really appreciate all the detailed replies. Lots of great advice to work on and think about. I understand now that I need to practice riding the surfboard much more aggressively and practice fast turns to toeside and no more than 2 step jibes. I also need to make a point to ride the surfboard more on the high end of my kites power range. When the wind picks up, I normally go back and get the twintip for jumping. Maybe someday I will pull that off on the directional.

I will get in the waves anytime I get the chance, but like other landlocked kiters, the moon and stars have to align for travel dates, wind and waves to all fall into place at the same time. When it happens I will do my best to be ready for it. :thumb:

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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby plummet » Wed Apr 16, 2014 5:54 pm

I'd just like to throw another idea out there.

Because your wave riding is so infrequent is learning to use a surfboard really worth while? Do you enjoy riding the surfboard on the flat? do you relish the idea of learning a new skill? Or are you learning to use a surfboard because that is what most people use in waves?
Is your primary goal to run down the line like a surfer with little input from the kite?
or do you want to have fun in the waves, boost a view jumps and slash up a few waves?

If you've been riding tt's for years and want a new challenge or really want that surfer feel over and above everything else then carry on down the surfboard track.

If you just want to get out and maximise your fun factor on the occasional times you are in the waves then I think using a surf styles TT/mutant is the better choice.

The reason I say this is that you could spend a lot of your time learning the board, practicing the jybes to get to the beach find a solid double overhead condition and still feel out of your depth on the surfboard and have a less enjoyable time than you would have otherwise had on the TT.

I'm in the surf 99% of the time and ride a mutant TT. Why? because I want to ride the waves like a kiter. I want to boost, I want to fang at high speed, blast the shallows and use the waves as my own personal amusement park. I also want to slash waves and run down the line when it suits me. But my own personal joy is to boost as high as possible on the way out and then ride the wave upwind back to the beach. For me the best board to do that style is a surf orientated TT or mutant. Not a surfboard.

The advice the guys are giving on how to ride a surfboard is bang on. But is riding a surfboard in the first place the right advice for someone so infrequently in the waves? My personal opinion is no its not.

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alpower
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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby alpower » Wed Apr 16, 2014 6:36 pm

:thumb:
plummet wrote:I'd just like to throw another idea out there.

Because your wave riding is so infrequent is learning to use a surfboard really worth while? Do you enjoy riding the surfboard on the flat? do you relish the idea of learning a new skill? Or are you learning to use a surfboard because that is what most people use in waves?
Is your primary goal to run down the line like a surfer with little input from the kite?
or do you want to have fun in the waves, boost a view jumps and slash up a few waves?

If you've been riding tt's for years and want a new challenge or really want that surfer feel over and above everything else then carry on down the surfboard track.

If you just want to get out and maximise your fun factor on the occasional times you are in the waves then I think using a surf styles TT/mutant is the better choice.

The reason I say this is that you could spend a lot of your time learning the board, practicing the jybes to get to the beach find a solid double overhead condition and still feel out of your depth on the surfboard and have a less enjoyable time than you would have otherwise had on the TT.

I'm in the surf 99% of the time and ride a mutant TT. Why? because I want to ride the waves like a kiter. I want to boost, I want to fang at high speed, blast the shallows and use the waves as my own personal amusement park. I also want to slash waves and run down the line when it suits me. But my own personal joy is to boost as high as possible on the way out and then ride the wave upwind back to the beach. For me the best board to do that style is a surf orientated TT or mutant. Not a surfboard.

The advice the guys are giving on how to ride a surfboard is bang on. But is riding a surfboard in the first place the right advice for someone so infrequently in the waves? My personal opinion is no its not.

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Re: Any wave advice for the infrequent rider,

Postby KYLakeKiter » Wed Apr 16, 2014 7:18 pm

Plummet, I like your hybrid perspective. Sounds like you get the best of both worlds. I have never actually seen a mutant in real life, so I will have to get my hands on one and check it out. I get what you are saying about efficiency of time spent and having the most fun. I guess my motivation for riding the surfboard comes from watching too many surf documentaries as a kid. I know I am not a surfer, but I like the idea of pulling myself into the wave with a kite and acting like I am one. I also like the feel of strapless riding.

Now to be bipolar, I also love being juiced up on a twintip and sending the kite as hard as I can. My timing is not so great yet, but it improves with every session.

I guess I just want to work on both styles even though I know it will take longer to progress.


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